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-   -   Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder (http://www.insidehoops.com/forum/showthread.php?t=181313)

MannyO 07-06-2010 10:51 PM

Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
I have been doubted by many people including my coach. They will tell me your game is not good, I cannot do this, I cannot do that. I am actually a good player and im not over hyping myself. When Im playing carefree I play very well, like for instance yesterday me and my friend played the alumni from our school they used to be on the team and they played D2 basketball. I played out of my mind I scored almost the points except and I played tremendous defense. We went on to win that game. But lets say its a situation like earlier that day at practice, my coach says make this FT and practice is over. Then he says if you miss that means you haven't been working and should not be on the team.

SO I the stakes are now high and I don't want to miss, but I end up messing up and missing.

My question is how can I play well with a chip on my shoulder and pressure situations?

JerrySteakhouse 07-07-2010 12:49 AM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
put it all on the line.. play agressive, thats the best advice I can give you... if you dont your gonna live with regret, something you DONT want ever

Fallguy20 07-07-2010 01:39 AM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Be composed. To do this, think this to yourself every single time you go and shootaround by yourself:

Be quick, don't hurry.



Pressure isnt an opportunity to screw up. Pressure is an opportunity to do something REALLY cool.

MannyO 07-07-2010 11:30 AM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
True, the thing is every little mistake I make is magnified because people are like oh yea look I knew you weren't going to be able to do this or that. After a while it just kept sticking in my head like what will my coach say. Yesterday I had a really off game and missed all of my first 3 shot attempts. Since then I stopped looking to score because I didn't want people to think I am being a liability to the team even though we really needed to score.

DevDaAllstar 07-07-2010 12:41 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Anger

Get angry at everybody you play against, like they slapped your mom. Get angry at your coach. Use that anger as feul to prove them wrong at all costs and that will translate into more motivation to pratice and do better.

623baller 07-07-2010 01:16 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
practice at game speed or even tougher than game speed and situations

give yourself some penalties that you don't want to go through for missing free throws

it's funny how you mentioned how are you supposed to play with a chip on your shoulder, but that's what players go through in real games against decent defense, also under pressure situations

if you made a mistake, hustle back on defense and get that ball back

same thing with a missed shot, dont look down, look up and see how you can get the ball back

you should never stop looking to score as opponets can sense that and they'll sag off on you, you should still attack but instead of trying to create your own shot, create for others or come off screens to get clean looks or dive to the basket

it's tough but once you get over this hump you'll be a better player, just stay mentally tough

Swaggin916 07-07-2010 01:54 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Yea man it's just as simple as staying mentally tough. You have to take that criticism and not let it get to you, but not completely blow it off either. I know for me sometimes when I get criticized I am like F u it's not like I am trying to F it up... but later I calm down and am like "Yea... I need to work on that." not only to shut them up, but to prove to myself I can do it. Just keep practicing and keep putting yourself in uncomfortable situations. Don't do it all the time, but every now and then, you need to do something you normally wouldn't (like shoot after missing a few shots) so that doubt begins to dissipate from your mind.

MannyO 07-07-2010 11:41 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
My main problem is that I let people into my head too much and it makes me real angry. Like my coach is an asshole so he thinks I cant make a left hand layup so sometimes he stops in the middle of practice and says make a left hand layup full speed and if you miss so and so consequence. That is not even necessary at all and it just gets to me and makes me angry.

How do you use this anger to help you play better because Ive heard people say "oh that kid plays angry".

Also Im thinking of using meditation techniques to help relax and help me slow the game down because sometimes I feel I rush things and force the action.

623baller 07-08-2010 02:25 AM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MannyO
My main problem is that I let people into my head too much and it makes me real angry. Like my coach is an asshole so he thinks I cant make a left hand layup so sometimes he stops in the middle of practice and says make a left hand layup full speed and if you miss so and so consequence. That is not even necessary at all and it just gets to me and makes me angry.

How do you use this anger to help you play better because Ive heard people say "oh that kid plays angry".

Also Im thinking of using meditation techniques to help relax and help me slow the game down because sometimes I feel I rush things and force the action.



to be honest, i don't see how your coach is wrong

he's basically taking it hard on you and your team in practice so you live up to the standards in a real game. if you cant make a left hand lay up at full speed in practice , then you probably can't do it in a real game

imagine you or someone on the team missing a layup that cost the team a game or even worse a championship, who would be sorry after that? i think it's just one of those you'll thank him later type of deal but you wont realize it until years down the road

best way is to ride through it is to use all the negativity and just explode off that, if you hate your coach then attack the rim and the lane like your coach is in the way that's a great way to keep your competitive fire up but dont make it a habit. you always see people lose their cool and it's easy to exploit those type of players. they are too easy to get pissed off which results in them overplaying on defense or over-aggressive on offense.

talk to your coach and ask how you can improve, im sure he'll give you some pointers . if you can , try to run a team for younger kids, you'll see the game differently when you are in the coach's seat as well, that will elevate your game too

DevDaAllstar 07-08-2010 03:48 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
When I say play with anger I mean use it as fuel or motivation. Not play out of control or over do things, over aggressive.

Like, play as if your defender offended you by drawing the assignment to defend you or get mad at your self and say "I will not miss easy lay-ups or FT's ever again". Like other people said play in attack mode. When in practice think of your coach or other people that doubted you as motivation to keep push yourself even when you're tired. Play as if you have something to prove to the world and you're willing to kill yourself trying to prove it.

As far as being mentally tough, nobody can stop you but you. If you keep telling yourself that nobody can get in your help ever again.

the_chosen_1 07-12-2010 03:49 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Staying mentally tough and focused is the key. I like to play angry like others have said. You just have to tell yourself that you will succeed and believe it.

JMT 07-12-2010 06:16 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MannyO
My main problem is that I let people into my head too much and it makes me real angry. Like my coach is an asshole so he thinks I cant make a left hand layup so sometimes he stops in the middle of practice and says make a left hand layup full speed and if you miss so and so consequence. That is not even necessary at all and it just gets to me and makes me angry.

How do you use this anger to help you play better because Ive heard people say "oh that kid plays angry".

Also Im thinking of using meditation techniques to help relax and help me slow the game down because sometimes I feel I rush things and force the action.


You won't like this, but your posts indicate that the problem is you.

You say you get angry at a coach who tells you to execute a simple play properly. If you want to be a real player, you should be furious at yourself if you can't execute the simplest play, excactly the right way, at anytime. That's what the game demands.

You miss a FT because you think about it being important. EVERY FT is important. If you're putting more emphasis on this one, it means you don't take the rest of them as seriously as you should.

You need to worry less about what's in your head or on your shoulder, and more about whether you are giving maximum effort, and working on the things that are obviously important to the important people (your coach).

The good thing is, you've also said the smartest thing in this thread:
Im thinking of using meditation techniques to help relax and help me slow the game down because sometimes I feel I rush things and force the action

A much better course of action than misguided attempts to make yourself angry. Sounds like you already do that, and it doesn't work.

It's funny how many people can recite Jordan's stats, MVP's, and every bit of minutiae, but ignore the most important aspect of the best player we've seen. It's in every interview about him. What do they say? "Michael hated to lose at anything...took even a card game as life and death."

It's not a mindset you can manufacture or turn on and off. Every rep, every shot, every FT, every drill. Maximum effort, maximum focus. It doesn't matter if your friends are being wiseasses, or hate the coach, or think they're better than he does. You focus on what you need to do to show them that you are prepared.

And at the end of the day? Take ownership of the criticism. Figure out what you need to do to give them what they require, not why they should be willing to accept what you're willing to give.

It's more than basketball. It's a life lesson.

MannyO 07-13-2010 12:56 AM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JMT
You won't like this, but your posts indicate that the problem is you.

You say you get angry at a coach who tells you to execute a simple play properly. If you want to be a real player, you should be furious at yourself if you can't execute the simplest play, excactly the right way, at anytime. That's what the game demands.

You miss a FT because you think about it being important. EVERY FT is important. If you're putting more emphasis on this one, it means you don't take the rest of them as seriously as you should.

You need to worry less about what's in your head or on your shoulder, and more about whether you are giving maximum effort, and working on the things that are obviously important to the important people (your coach).

The good thing is, you've also said the smartest thing in this thread:
Im thinking of using meditation techniques to help relax and help me slow the game down because sometimes I feel I rush things and force the action

A much better course of action than misguided attempts to make yourself angry. Sounds like you already do that, and it doesn't work.

It's funny how many people can recite Jordan's stats, MVP's, and every bit of minutiae, but ignore the most important aspect of the best player we've seen. It's in every interview about him. What do they say? "Michael hated to lose at anything...took even a card game as life and death."

It's not a mindset you can manufacture or turn on and off. Every rep, every shot, every FT, every drill. Maximum effort, maximum focus. It doesn't matter if your friends are being wiseasses, or hate the coach, or think they're better than he does. You focus on what you need to do to show them that you are prepared.

And at the end of the day? Take ownership of the criticism. Figure out what you need to do to give them what they require, not why they should be willing to accept what you're willing to give.

It's more than basketball. It's a life lesson.



no thats not the problem. My coach is a pure ASSHOLE, anything coming out of his mouth is negative. For example, he will put someone on the spot and say make a jumpshot, even if you make it he will say ew your shot looks ugly. Or he tells us we are the worst players hes ever had. How are you supposed to play with someone like that? Your coach is supposed to lift you up not feed you negativity all the time. He makes basketball stressful.

JMT 07-13-2010 01:36 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MannyO
no thats not the problem. My coach is a pure ASSHOLE, anything coming out of his mouth is negative. For example, he will put someone on the spot and say make a jumpshot, even if you make it he will say ew your shot looks ugly. Or he tells us we are the worst players hes ever had. How are you supposed to play with someone like that? Your coach is supposed to lift you up not feed you negativity all the time. He makes basketball stressful.


Interesting that your first, quick, and only response was to point a finger and take none of the blame or responsibility on yourself. In your orignal post you clearly pointed out some areas where your thought process was impacting your performance. But you're not interested in hearing that same critique from someone else; only you are allowed to critique you.

Dude, the world is full of assholes, and many of them are in charge.

Your coach is responsible to other people...possibly assholes... who want him to win. That's his responsibility. He, in turn, puts that pressure on his players. And the reality of life is that you will always have a simple choice: deal with it or not. You're not obligated to play. He's not oblgated to make you feel warm and fuzzy.

I've played for every kind of coach imaginable, and something good came out of each relationship. Now, maybe the something good was learning how to focus on myself and ignore emotional responses and negative energy derived from being around an asshole. May not sound like much, but it's an important lesson to learn.

Maybe the shot does look ugly. Maybe you are the worst payers he's ever had. Regardless, whether in sports, school, business, etc, one rule always applies: Unless you're the lead dog, the view never changes.

And you are not the lead dog.

Good luck.

MannyO 07-13-2010 05:17 PM

Re: Playing With A Chip On My Shoulder
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JMT
Interesting that your first, quick, and only response was to point a finger and take none of the blame or responsibility on yourself. In your orignal post you clearly pointed out some areas where your thought process was impacting your performance. But you're not interested in hearing that same critique from someone else; only you are allowed to critique you.

Dude, the world is full of assholes, and many of them are in charge.

Your coach is responsible to other people...possibly assholes... who want him to win. That's his responsibility. He, in turn, puts that pressure on his players. And the reality of life is that you will always have a simple choice: deal with it or not. You're not obligated to play. He's not oblgated to make you feel warm and fuzzy.

I've played for every kind of coach imaginable, and something good came out of each relationship. Now, maybe the something good was learning how to focus on myself and ignore emotional responses and negative energy derived from being around an asshole. May not sound like much, but it's an important lesson to learn.

Maybe the shot does look ugly. Maybe you are the worst payers he's ever had. Regardless, whether in sports, school, business, etc, one rule always applies: Unless you're the lead dog, the view never changes.

And you are not the lead dog.

Good luck.



Im not saying im perfect and Ive said that before that there are flaws in my game and I consider myself a decent player. Im just learning to deal with such a coach that will just constantly tell you negative things. The conclusion I came to was just play your game and ignore him and all the others that give negative sht.


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