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Old 05-01-2012, 05:20 PM   #4
Rake2204
7-time NBA All-Star
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 12,335
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Default Re: Basketball in game Habits

Quote:
Originally Posted by C_lake2802
Change your court up. you be surprised what different set of players and environment can do for you
Great piece of advice. I'm always nervous to play at new, completely unfamiliar environments but there's no doubt it brings out my basketball survival skills: running the floor hard, rebounding, scrapping, doing all the extra things. When we play amongst regulars at comfortable locations, it's easy to fall too much into a groove, where you know what everyone else is going to bring to the table and you know exactly how much effort you must exert to succeed or get by.

If a new location isn't possible, it's going to end up being mental. A lot of times, I'll make myself think about how hard I'd be going if someone whose opinion I cared about was there to watch me (my little brothers, my girlfriend, etc.).

I also say you should challenge yourself to get to your second wind. Run hard and when it feels like you can no longer exert maximum energy, keep running anyway. It sounds so simple, but clearly it all comes down to will power and brain power. You seem to know when you should be running so . . . you must instill that ability to push yourself once again to run at those times. Test yourself frequently. When a teammate steals the ball and finds themselves streaking for an open layup, make yourself sprint and trail the play, just in case. Those little bits of effort go a long way toward re-establishing energy and effort.
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