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Old 08-12-2012, 09:51 AM   #18
Rake2204
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Default Re: Tips on protecting the ball(especially when going up)

Quote:
Originally Posted by SourPatchKids
Thanks for the advice guys. Also, is there a counter move to the eurostep like if it gets too predictable for the defender? The only moves I really use in transition are pausing at the free throw then changing speed & finishing, spinning of the defender for a lay in the middle of the lane, and the eurostep.
Welp, for me, the Euro-step is my counter move to the hard drive. If a defender is not in position to square me up or set his feet while I'm in transition, I'm probably going right to the rack and finishing strong. I'm only breaking out the Euro if my defender has position and he's bought into the fact I'm likely going to try a direct route to the hoop. At that point, as we all know, the initial step of the Euro is to convince him of his prediction while the second step would be in the opposite direction of where he's headed.

Basically, I don't Euro without reason. And even then, it's always possible for the defender to make a spectacular play or to outsmart you by making you think he thought you were going all the way to the rack when he actually knew that'd lead you to Euro-stepping. At that point, there's not a whole lot that can be done. Sometimes the defense wins the chess match.

To be really honest, if you're just looking for another fast break direction change to add to the arsenal, I'd add the behind the back gather. I mean this sincerely when I say it's really not as difficult as people like to think it is. It's perfect for moments when a defender thinks he's got a beat on the ball and is playing to stop the front of your body. It's a situation where he might be able to challenge you at the rim if you go strong or strip you if you attempt a Euro. The behind the back gather allows for a seamless direction change where the defender is not allowed a play on the ball. I use it most often when a defender is overplaying one side of my body, seemingly funneling me in one direction. It's particularly effective if your showing of the ball on one side convinces the defense to go for the strip; in that case the results could look spectacular. This is a perfect example, except in full truth, the finish is usually not as complicated as Jennings made his here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEy1olTfCn8

Last edited by Rake2204 : 08-12-2012 at 09:53 AM.
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