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Old 11-16-2012, 12:00 PM   #12
Droid101
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Default Re: R.I.P. Hostess bakery

Quote:
Originally Posted by gigantes
Any idea what made Hostess prey to that in the first place? Can we expect the same thing to happen to more high-profile companys?
This is from Wikipedia, so grain of salt and all that:

When extended-shelf-life enzymes were developed for bread, the hope was to convert the system of many small inefficient bakeries into an efficient network of a relatively few giant bakeries like their snack cakes operation. However, the recipe using the new enzymes caused the bread to have a different taste and texture,[10] and other market forces like a resurrection of the Atkins diet and competitor Krispy Kreme doughnuts affected pricing and sales volume.
Quote:
2004 Bankruptcy

On September 22, 2004, Interstate Bakeries filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The company also named a new chief executive, Tony Alvarez. Interstate Bakery's stock, which had been at one time $34/share, fell to $2.05/share as they declared bankruptcy. At the time it was the longest bankruptcy in U.S. history. During bankruptcy, Interstate fought a 2007 bid from Mexican baked goods giant Grupo Bimbo and Ron Burkle of the Yucaipa Companies. [11]

With the leadership of Craig Jung, the company emerged from bankruptcy as a private company on February 3, 2009.[12] The plan included a 50 percent equity stake by Ripplewood Holdings and lines/loans by General Electric Capital and GE Capital Markets, Silver Point Finance and Monarch Master Funding. Interstate's union workers made contract concessions in exchange for equity.[13]

During the 2004-2009 bankruptcy period, Interstate closed nine of its 54 bakeries and more than 300 outlet stores. Interstate's work force declined from 32,000 to 22,000 employees. The company also dropped some regional brands and operating agreements, such as the agreement to produce Sunbeam Bread for the northeastern U.S. (now produced by LePage Bakeries of Auburn, Maine)..[13]
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