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Old 03-18-2013, 02:28 PM   #37
DukeDelonte13
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Default Re: Going to be a dad, need ISH tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by boozehound
this is ignorant. Its not that hard to have a balanced vegetarian diet. I am not a vegetarian, but it is silly how they are called out for an unbalanced diet when more kids who eat meat have nutritional deficiencies/malnutrition due to idiot/ignorant parents. Its a classic scapegoat/strawman.

I find it hilarious that both you and dukey use numbers (improbable ones at that) when you are talking hyperbole out of your ass.

and you follow it up with an anecdote about a burly toddler you know. I get it. It's possible to supplement the diet with the iron and proteins the kid needs. But why do that sh*t? Why not just be normal and feed them the meat that their stomachs were designed to digest?

from your article:

Quote:
If the child's pediatrician isn't aware that the child is a vegetarian, the doctor may not know to test for iron deficiency, Bhatia says. Iron deficiency may not become apparent until the child is older, Bhatia says, and at that point, the child may actually have irreversible cognitive defects.

The more restricted the diet, the more difficult it is for vegetarian children to get all of the nutrients they need. Bhatia says lacto-ovo vegetarians those who won't eat meat, fish and poultry but will eat dairy and eggs are at the least risk for undernutrition.

Vegan children, a small but growing group, are another story. Vitamin B-12 is found naturally only in animal products, and vegans may also be at risk for insufficient intake of vitamin D, calcium, zinc and riboflavin.

"I think it's very difficult to healthfully raise a vegan child," says Rebecca Roach, a registered dietitian and teaching associate at the University of Illinois' Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. "It can be done, but it needs to be someone who really understands the nutrient needs for their child."

your other article was devoid of sources. It's a risk not worth taking IMO.

EDIT: not trying to call out OP, i'm sure him and his lady will do everything necessary to ensure their kid gets proper nutrition.

Last edited by DukeDelonte13 : 03-18-2013 at 02:31 PM.
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