View Single Post
Old 04-12-2013, 10:41 AM   #12
Rake2204
7-time NBA All-Star
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 12,508
Rake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginable
Default Re: Shooting like Stephen Curry?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cross30
You need to practice a lot and also practice the right way.
Yep yep. It often seems the first thing that's often thrown out when someone wants to improve their jumper is, "You have to shoot 100, 500, 1000, or 100000 jumpers per day." I also believe repetition is important, but not nearly as important as establishing the correct form.

And sure, I know practicing the right form sounds obvious, but it's truly not. Number of shots is very commonly held to a higher standard than the types of shots one is taken. I find it similar to the idea that the longer you're at a basketball court, the better you're going to get. When in truth, if one is able to practice for five hours at a time, there's a chance that means they might just not be going hard enough. I remember reading how Richard Hamilton's basketball workouts were relatively brief, because he went hard for the duration.

It's kind of like, what's more effective - a guy who's hammering 1,000 crooked nails over a five hour period? Or the guy who took the time to learn how to do it right? And is it possible for the guy with the correct form to hammer 1,000 nails? Sure. But in terms of basketball shooting, the cart is often put before the horse.

And as amber said, it takes a lot of reps to change one's stroke and that's the other issue I look out for when a player is attempting to put in a lot of reps at one time. I work with my little brother's shooting touch (15 years old) and when we're actually going through and piecing it together, it really begins to look legit. And when we get to actually putting in action, again, it looks pretty solid. But if he does not focus on every single one of the jumpers he's taking, can you guess what happens? His old form leaks back in and before you know it, the feet are together and crooked again, the body's twisting, the whole shebang.

So I guess I say all this as caution. If you're going to put up a lot of shots at one time, make sure it's the right stroke first. Shooting a lot of the wrong shot may still help a little, but not as much as you'd probably prefer.

Last edited by Rake2204 : 04-12-2013 at 10:46 AM.
Rake2204 is offline   Reply With Quote