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Old 04-29-2013, 04:53 PM   #11
Rake2204
7-time NBA All-Star
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
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Default Re: Knowing your role on a team

Quote:
Originally Posted by Svendiggity
I was wondering; when you figure out your weakness as a player, how do you know if it's something you could never excel at, or if it's something you just need to practice?

For example, I play kind of like Steve Blake. I shoot open three's, pass the ball to the open man, rarely turn the ball over and play solid defense. Against some weaker competition I can get to the hoop. But I'm beginning to think I just have to accept that this is who I am and instead of practicing new things, just practice what I know I'm capable of. I practiced crossovers and hop steps and what not and I can do them but my moves just don't seem explosive enough to employ.

So what is your experience when facing this issue as a player?
I think there's a difference between knowing your strengths while playing a real game versus knowing what you can never excel at. Personally, I'm always looking for things to add to my game. It's what keeps basketball fresh and unique. I think you'd be surprised what you're capable of developing and eventually adding to your game.

For instance, about ten years ago there was actually a time where Euro-stepping was not a part of my game. But of course, I thought it'd be a good addition so I figured out the steps, committed some time to it, worked, and slowly, I began experimenting with it in games. It was a little rough initially but as with everything, the more time and repetition I put in, the more natural the move began to occur, ultimately leading it to become a reliable part of my repertoire.

You mention your crossovers and hop steps not being explosive enough. I do not believe that means you're not meant to perform moves like that. It just sounds like they need some more practice. If you do not want to continue tinkering and working on them, then yes, I believe you may have to accept not being able to do them (not that there's anything wrong with that). But truthfully, if you experiment with them and work, there's a good chance you're going to find a way to make those moves useful for you at some point.

I think it's healthy and fun to continue looking to add things. I get stuck in a rut every now and again of only doing moves I've had in my arsenal for a while. Sometimes it just takes a little bit of extra thought to remind ourselves to continue moving forward and evolving. It's not magic, and it takes work, but oftentimes it's worth it.
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