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Old 08-01-2013, 12:48 PM   #11
Thorpesaurous
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Default Re: Top 10 video games of all time..

I'm probably just enough older for my list to look a little weird, although it's pretty much a mash up between Rhthmic's and Glide's lists.

Zelda I - The game that changed everything for me as a kid. Prior to that games were a fun distraction. After that they were unread adventure books.


Metroid - Sort of like Zelda in that it just kind of invented this mazy sort of gameplay that made exploration part of gaming. And a spacey sci fi setting, and a mind blowing ending.


Resident Evil 1 - The tank play is archaic at this point, but this was the first thing that felt really 3D exploration to me, put in the horror genre that was spectacular at the time. And sort of is the precursor to the cinematic element that is so prevelant now, with the way the camera cut even from within a room, not just room to room. And just love the way the house opens up as you go.

Resident Evil 2 - just a huge upgrade from 1 to 2 in terms of graphics. I didn't like the layout as much as the house. Felt more tree branchy to me, where you kind of just went forward, found a gate or a key, then went back the other way. But expanding on the story, and not just sort of starting a new adventure, but how it felt like a real movie sequel, was awesome.

Resident Evil 4 - The reboot of the series. I didn't play it for a long time because I didn't like that it became another over the shoulder shooter, but after finally getting it, I was blown away.

GTA Vice City - I've liked all the GTAs, but this one is by far my favorite. I know it's small compared to SA, and there's isn't as much sandboxyness, but to me it was the cheekiest of the satire we've seen from Rockstar. The notable actors playing the characters, the way the era could be lampooned in terms of clothes and music. That's why I like Vice City the best.

Red Dead Redemption - The Western was a game genre that had been tried before, but I'm not sure anyone ever got anything so right. It's a perfect genre for an open world. All the little side add ons were great like the hunting and random missions and stranger missions, card games, bountys. Just everything. And they got the horse riding right, which was a huge element. Story is spectacular. Music is spot on. Great great game.

Uncharted 2 - I still prefer 2 to 3. Don't underestimate the jaw dropping element of it at the time of it's release, the jump from 1, which was a spectacular game, to 2, was just absurd. Again, this blew the doors off the cinematic experience of playing a game. The pacing was perfect. The gunplay and cover system was clean. The animations just in regular play just made it feel unlike anything I'd played up to that point. 3 is great too, but it didn't have the wow factor 2 did for me at the time, where I felt like I had to tell my friends about it, which is weird seeing as I was in my 30s and most of them had kids.

The Last of Us - This took the Uncharted cinematic layout, and just dropped an exquisite story on it, while changing the gameplay mechanism just enough, providing that survival feel of adrenaline and intensity, with the limited supplies and genuinely scary bad guys, to make it feel totally fresh. It's like a cross between Uncharted and Resident Evil, with the story being less hokey. How was I not gonna love it.

Those are the nine that just immediately jump out at me. You'll notice ... I'm not an XBox guy, which I know cost me some stuff I probably would've loved, like Mass Effect perhaps. I'm not a FPS guy. I like exploration. I pretty much skipped the 16 bit generation, which isn't true. I went Genesis then PS, not Super Nintendo or N64, so I'm missing the continuation of the Zelda series, which I genuinely regret, and Metroid to a degree. But I will say I was in middle school at that point, starting to get boners, becoming increasingly physical and competitive, and getting into trouble, so I was probably out chasing girls, playing basketball or football, and / or experimenting with drugs and alcohol. So gaming probably was gonna get away from me some anyway through those years. I believe RE1 was late HS for me, which sort of got me back in some, and there's a lot of time in college to get back into it, even with all the trouble there is to get into. Then I came back to it as I got older. So I have my fantasy years as a kid, then come back later.

There's a number of things that could take that tenth spot. San Andreas. A Madden. Mike Tyson's Punch Out was a seminal experience as a kid. I had way more fun playing Onimusha than it probably deserved. An Assassin's Creed, probably 3. I can't remember the name of my favorite old Genesis game, which was really violent, but that's possible. There was an old Super Nintendo College Basketball game that I loved, it was 3D with no crowd, but the camera always stayed behind the ball, which is something I wondered why didn't take off, instead going to the universal isometric angle. Either of the first two Dead Space's could make the cut. Or I could go way outside the box with something like Tetris on the car rides as a kid on my gameboy. Or walking along the boardwalk on our summer vacations at Hampton beach and bouncing from arcade to arcade and waiting in line to play Mortal Combat, or sneaking into the last arcade that had a hidden Dragon's Lair in the back we could take turns on. Or even go with something like PixelJunk's Shooter, which was the game that made me start actively looking into Indy DL games, which led to Limbo and Journey and The Walking Dead Episodes, all of which I could make a case for.

I love video games. I'm just afraid they'll stop making them for people who like them how I like them someday. The games I like are expensive to produce, and have a limited audience because they don't exist for online shit talking. That'll be a sad day.

Last edited by Thorpesaurous : 08-01-2013 at 12:52 PM.
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