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Thread: Running the fastbreak

  1. #1
    2nd Greatest Player Lebron23's Avatar
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    Default Running the fastbreak

    I love to run, and sometimes I get most of my points when my team runs a fast break.

    I think I actually have a good stamina because I don't smoke. Last time I smoked a cigar was almost 12 years ago when I was 15.

    Some basic fastbreak drills/play from youtube.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ply3Sym_Z-Y

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dM83SbRgFQk

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bi1xLpDxa3Q

  2. #2
    2nd Greatest Player Lebron23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    and running a fast break is also effective against taller,heftier, and slower opponents.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    I'm a huge proponent of pushing and running, especially amongst middle-class levels of basketball competition. I've played in a lot of areas where really pushing the tempo just isn't something that's wired into programs and basketball dialects, so it can be extremely advantageous to me.

    This aspect of the game is also something I've passed down to my younger brother. Now, as a senior in the Ann Arbor area, he's one of the most dangerous players in the open floor throughout his conference. I sort of wish he rebounded a little better from his position because when he does snag a board, he's out like 2002 Jason Kidd. And like I said, a lot of the types of competition he sees is just not used to defending that.

    Me:



    My bro, ten years later:

    Last edited by Rake2204; 01-27-2014 at 09:58 PM.

  4. #4
    I am ZeNs B*tch Ai2death's Avatar
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    Man, I wish I had a older brother who mentored me in basketball, or at least someone with experience.
    Nice work.

  5. #5
    2nd Greatest Player Lebron23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    Quote Originally Posted by Rake2204
    I'm a huge proponent of pushing and running, especially amongst middle-class levels of basketball competition. I've played in a lot of areas where really pushing the tempo just isn't something that's wired into programs and basketball dialects, so it can be extremely advantageous to me.

    This aspect of the game is also something I've passed down to my younger brother. Now, as a senior in the Ann Arbor area, he's one of the most dangerous players in the open floor throughout his conference. I sort of wish he rebounded a little better from his position because when he does snag a board, he's out like 2002 Jason Kidd. And like I said, a lot of the types of competition he sees is just not used to defending that.

    Me:



    My bro, ten years later:

    Nice you have a very nice looking layup.

  6. #6
    Saw a basketball once
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    Man, I love playing an up tempo style that emphasizes pushing the ball. I think because you don't see it as often in the modern NBA game people don't tend to look for it when they play in rec leagues, high school, etc. Teams I've played on have always played this type of game because usually we have been outmatched in height, and quick, easy buckets are a great way to stay in those games, not to mention they wear the other team down if they are not use to playing at that pace.

    The most important thing for pushing the tempo, at least what I was always taught, was getting the defensive rebound. Get the board than look up for the guy ahead, preferably in the middle of the floor, with guys filling the wings.

    Most teams struggle defending it (at least teams I've played) because they are quite happy to saunter back, expecting the opposition to stroll the ball downcourt before getting into an offensive set. That combined with teams usually poor at having good floor spacing (eg. a guy at the top of the key who is at least prepared to work hard back onto D in the case of a leak out), it's surprising how often guys on our teams could cherry pick baskets.

    So, have guys committed to getting on the boards, secure the ball, then look ahead - get the ball in the center of the court and have guys fill the wings (also doesn't hurt to have a big guy barreling down the lane as a trailer either).

  7. #7
    NBA sixth man of the year Thorpesaurous's Avatar
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    In the last couple years I've taken on a small coaching gig with my best friend, coaching his sons in a local youth basketball program. They're 8 and 6, and play together. It's a real youth community program, so it's an "everyone gets to play a half, and isn't little Johnny doing so good", kind of a league. Not my favorite thing, but it has it's place. Everyone needs a place to start, and it keeps the late bloomers from being completely pushed to the wayside. However my biggest gripe is that in trying to accomadate everyone, they accomadate instead almost no one. We get one one hour practice a week on half a court. It's just useless really.

    Anyway. One of the rules at this age is no pressing. Nothing beyond the hash mark of the hoop your going at. It's not something that I'm opposed to, because it keeps the game from turning into a rugby scrum. However a habit it enforces is that kids tend to get the ball, then hold it and wait for everyone to clear out, because it's "safe" back there. Last year I taught outlet passing and had two kids who could push the ball a bit. We scored over 30 a game on 8 minute running quarters with 7 year olds. This year I just haven't been able to get it through to them, and even when I do, I don't really have the ball handlers I did last year. Also we moved up to 9 year olds, skipping a level to try and push my buddy's son, who's genuinely very good. And we're having a hell of a tough season.

    Generally I agree. I always try to teach pushing, and then try to reign it in after. It's a delicate balance between going too fast and not fast enough. And the answer isn't always "well I scored". But I find it easier to rev it up and try to bring it back than try to inch it up to where I want it.

  8. #8
    hon hon hon eat snails 9512's Avatar
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    I scored my career high of 12 points scoring on fast breaks. Only time I reached double digits in one game though lol

    I was and still am a scrub and easy buckets can scored off of fast breaks so it does pay off to hustle on offense.

    Also being a trailer runner behind a teammate pays off too. What if he misses his layup? You can get a tip in.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorpesaurous
    However a habit it enforces is that kids tend to get the ball, then hold it and wait for everyone to clear out, because it's "safe" back there.
    This is my least favorite habits in the world. Unfortunately, as we're well aware, it's not limited to young hoopsters in non-press leagues. Between my junior and senior year we lost our primary pushing guard. In his place was someone who couldn't get enough of "turtling" after grabbing a defensive rebound or receiving an outlet pass. Terribly, terribly frustrating for someone who likes to get out and run. That vision (of the guard pivoting backward and shielding the ball) is one of the defining memories of my senior year.

  10. #10
    why I even like Rondo CeltsGarlic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Running the fastbreak

    well that running game often associates for me to a poor level of game played. I hate when 70% of possessions are fast breaks, even tho I tend to be good at those.

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