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Old 12-20-2012, 09:50 PM   #16
andgar923
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Default Re: How does Macy's stay in business?

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Originally Posted by Duderonomy
Macy's seems to be the cornerstone of many upscale malls but I never see anyone shopping there.

For the most part they're only used as a mall entrance/exit by people.

A few years ago I got a $50.00 gift card for Macy's and I had trouble finding anything worthwhile for under 50 bucks (meaning everything is over-priced).

So how do they stay in business considering I mostly only see a few women buying perfume there ?

out of curiosity, where do YOU shop at?

Macy's aims to have something for just about everybody. And not every Macy's carry the same items. Maybe the Macy's you went to didn't have something that fit your preference. But because it didn't have what you wanted, it doesn't mean that people don't shop there.

As far as pricing is concerned, Macy's is priced very competitively for equal or similar items.

But the main reason Macy's has managed to be successful is because they bridge the gap between top designers/style and price.

You can find somewhat niche items that only certain boutiques will carry, and high end designer brands next to bargain priced items. Even the lower end items are usually more stylish (relatively speaking) than something you'd find at competitors like JC Penny, Sears, Wal Mart etc. etc.

You can shop for a young trendy person or your grandpa, at competitive prices. Macy's also carries exclusive brands that no other retailer has.

I know its hip to shit on a popular store that appeals to the mass consumer, but there's a reason why they're so successful.
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Old 12-20-2012, 09:59 PM   #17
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Default Re: How does Macy's stay in business?

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Originally Posted by DMV2
Somewhat related (expensive clothes and brand) question...

Why is the North Face so popular? I don't see why there's any difference between them and Columbia or Timberland. Timberland used to hot back in the 90's, not so much nowadays.

Just supply and demand I guess. I see so many people on campus wearing North Face. It's sort of like those Ralph Lauren polos. They are insanely over priced because everyone wants them.
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