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Old 03-11-2009, 08:06 AM   #16
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Do a search on google for Iman Maleki.





just a couple of examples, but there are loads more...
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Old 03-11-2009, 09:35 AM   #17
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamgine
Please do tell why paintings such as these:



sold for millions? One is a paintings of fruits, another looks like my little sister can make it, and the last is a guy. They all cost over $50 million. What-the-F*ck.

Art is about so much more than just what you see; it is both a visible record of an artist's thoughts, feelings, and personality as well as a tangible link to political, social, economic, religious, etc. issues and developments of the past.

All of the artists that you have chosen here (Cezanne, Pollock, Van Gogh) are pioneers of in the history of the development of visual language. All are responding to specific cultural ideas in unique ways.

The industrial revolution and the subsequent advent of the modern condition brought myriad new sensory experiences and socio/political questions to the artist. One of the ways that artists will respond to modernity (and to the development of photography) was to create art that was steeped in what postmodernists would call reflexivity and intertextuality. Simply put, artists (not just painters but sculptors and, to some extent, architects too) abandon classicism, realism, and naturalism in favor of creating art that was about itself.

Cezanne, for example, is not interested in the fleeting sensory experiences of the Impressionists, thus the noticeable break from Impressionist landscapes towards the more traditionally static still-life. Nor is he concerned with painting "apples that look like apples." Instead, in his attempt to bring something more solid and durable to painting in an age dominated by the movement and change of the Impressionists, he begins to explore the very foundations of painting. Thus, he explores shapes and provides simple distortions (outlining shapes with dark lines, incorrect perspective, etc.) in order to get the viewer to understand his belief that all forms in nature were distortions of ideal shapes (spheres, cones, cubes, cylinders). This unique interpretation of traditional Platonic idealism would inform his later pictures in which he began to explore how one could construct a painting and create something interpretable with abstract renderings of simple shapes. This, in turn, would have a huge influence on later artists, particularly the Cubists Picasso and Braque.

Pollock also explores the idea of art that is about art, but in a different way. His is directly linked to the idea of the index, or the tangible record of the contact between the artist and the canvas. However, much more than simply painting pictures with a visible brushstroke, Pollock makes the subject of his paintings the act of painting itself (and thus he is called the father of action painting). Ignoring the subtle rhythmic interplay between lines and colors, or his challenging the limits and boundaries of the canvas (something that you could go on about forever), the real crux of Pollock's work, and perhaps the reason why it sells for so much, becomes the visible record of his movements. His paintings are thus a footprint (or perhaps more accurately, a handprint); its his own version of Hollywood stars memorializing their handprints in cement.

Van Gogh learned from the Impressionists the expressive power of color, so much so that color is the dominant creative force at work in his paintings. Like Cezanne, Van Gogh absorbs Impressionist ideas and then breaks away from them to such an extent that he is frequently dubbed a Post-Impressionist. The focus of his works becomes the juxtopositioning of brilliant colors and the dynamic, vibrant, energetic brushstrokes. He therefore became a major influence on the later Expressionists, including Matisse and Kandinsky.
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Old 03-11-2009, 10:11 AM   #18
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeorDeath
Art is about so much more than just what you see; it is both a visible record of an artist's thoughts, feelings, and personality as well as a tangible link to political, social, economic, religious, etc. issues and developments of the past.

All of the artists that you have chosen here (Cezanne, Pollock, Van Gogh) are pioneers of in the history of the development of visual language. All are responding to specific cultural ideas in unique ways.

The industrial revolution and the subsequent advent of the modern condition brought myriad new sensory experiences and socio/political questions to the artist. One of the ways that artists will respond to modernity (and to the development of photography) was to create art that was steeped in what postmodernists would call reflexivity and intertextuality. Simply put, artists (not just painters but sculptors and, to some extent, architects too) abandon classicism, realism, and naturalism in favor of creating art that was about itself.

Cezanne, for example, is not interested in the fleeting sensory experiences of the Impressionists, thus the noticeable break from Impressionist landscapes towards the more traditionally static still-life. Nor is he concerned with painting "apples that look like apples." Instead, in his attempt to bring something more solid and durable to painting in an age dominated by the movement and change of the Impressionists, he begins to explore the very foundations of painting. Thus, he explores shapes and provides simple distortions (outlining shapes with dark lines, incorrect perspective, etc.) in order to get the viewer to understand his belief that all forms in nature were distortions of ideal shapes (spheres, cones, cubes, cylinders). This unique interpretation of traditional Platonic idealism would inform his later pictures in which he began to explore how one could construct a painting and create something interpretable with abstract renderings of simple shapes. This, in turn, would have a huge influence on later artists, particularly the Cubists Picasso and Braque.

Pollock also explores the idea of art that is about art, but in a different way. His is directly linked to the idea of the index, or the tangible record of the contact between the artist and the canvas. However, much more than simply painting pictures with a visible brushstroke, Pollock makes the subject of his paintings the act of painting itself (and thus he is called the father of action painting). Ignoring the subtle rhythmic interplay between lines and colors, or his challenging the limits and boundaries of the canvas (something that you could go on about forever), the real crux of Pollock's work, and perhaps the reason why it sells for so much, becomes the visible record of his movements. His paintings are thus a footprint (or perhaps more accurately, a handprint); its his own version of Hollywood stars memorializing their handprints in cement.

Van Gogh learned from the Impressionists the expressive power of color, so much so that color is the dominant creative force at work in his paintings. Like Cezanne, Van Gogh absorbs Impressionist ideas and then breaks away from them to such an extent that he is frequently dubbed a Post-Impressionist. The focus of his works becomes the juxtopositioning of brilliant colors and the dynamic, vibrant, energetic brushstrokes. He therefore became a major influence on the later Expressionists, including Matisse and Kandinsky.

You're Art History T.A. is proud of you for regurgitating this material.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:08 PM   #19
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeorDeath
Art is about so much more than just what you see; it is both a visible record of an artist's thoughts, feelings, and personality as well as a tangible link to political, social, economic, religious, etc. issues and developments of the past.

All of the artists that you have chosen here (Cezanne, Pollock, Van Gogh) are pioneers of in the history of the development of visual language. All are responding to specific cultural ideas in unique ways.

The industrial revolution and the subsequent advent of the modern condition brought myriad new sensory experiences and socio/political questions to the artist. One of the ways that artists will respond to modernity (and to the development of photography) was to create art that was steeped in what postmodernists would call reflexivity and intertextuality. Simply put, artists (not just painters but sculptors and, to some extent, architects too) abandon classicism, realism, and naturalism in favor of creating art that was about itself.

Cezanne, for example, is not interested in the fleeting sensory experiences of the Impressionists, thus the noticeable break from Impressionist landscapes towards the more traditionally static still-life. Nor is he concerned with painting "apples that look like apples." Instead, in his attempt to bring something more solid and durable to painting in an age dominated by the movement and change of the Impressionists, he begins to explore the very foundations of painting. Thus, he explores shapes and provides simple distortions (outlining shapes with dark lines, incorrect perspective, etc.) in order to get the viewer to understand his belief that all forms in nature were distortions of ideal shapes (spheres, cones, cubes, cylinders). This unique interpretation of traditional Platonic idealism would inform his later pictures in which he began to explore how one could construct a painting and create something interpretable with abstract renderings of simple shapes. This, in turn, would have a huge influence on later artists, particularly the Cubists Picasso and Braque.

Pollock also explores the idea of art that is about art, but in a different way. His is directly linked to the idea of the index, or the tangible record of the contact between the artist and the canvas. However, much more than simply painting pictures with a visible brushstroke, Pollock makes the subject of his paintings the act of painting itself (and thus he is called the father of action painting). Ignoring the subtle rhythmic interplay between lines and colors, or his challenging the limits and boundaries of the canvas (something that you could go on about forever), the real crux of Pollock's work, and perhaps the reason why it sells for so much, becomes the visible record of his movements. His paintings are thus a footprint (or perhaps more accurately, a handprint); its his own version of Hollywood stars memorializing their handprints in cement.

Van Gogh learned from the Impressionists the expressive power of color, so much so that color is the dominant creative force at work in his paintings. Like Cezanne, Van Gogh absorbs Impressionist ideas and then breaks away from them to such an extent that he is frequently dubbed a Post-Impressionist. The focus of his works becomes the juxtopositioning of brilliant colors and the dynamic, vibrant, energetic brushstrokes. He therefore became a major influence on the later Expressionists, including Matisse and Kandinsky.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:21 PM   #20
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

good to see some 'art people' answered back to the 'sports people'.
and somehow i'm not surprised that not a single sports person replied with a "oh okay, i understand a bit better now," much less anything at all. good job people - ISH never disappoints in that way. :P

anyway, regarding this one:


van gogh is my second favorite artist for just such paintings as these.
i mean yes, i note his place in art history and am impressed and touched by the story of his sad, turbulent life, but when it comes to the art itself then screw that stuff. he's a kickass painter, period, for things like the piece above.

the painting above is a typical example of how van gogh blended elements of the childlike with the skill of a master. any child or fool could have made the individual simple brushstrokes, but putting them all together as a whole required a genius such as his.

in that painting you can see motion and stillness, the crude and the refined, the placid and the despairing, the harmonious and the tense, colors fighting against each other and colors in conflict. it takes a master to represent all these things at the same time, and to those of you who think that guys like van gogh had very little skill as a representational artist, you are wrong - when he was in his teens he had already mastered the making of photorealistic copies of his source. then he moved on to things more challenging to the viewer, because that is a big part of what every great piece of art does - it challenges you to either react like a hopeless sheep or to grasp the many levels of complexity or profundity the artist has put there for you.

in the end, great art is not about money, class, the artist's reputation, standing, importance or anything else. it's about something more vital than any of that stuff.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:23 PM   #21
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

I'll never understand paintings or artwork in that sense, as I can't draw for ****, so I was never interested in the least. I was always more of a writer. In my opinion, with writing (be it a novel or even lyrics that make Nickelback sound complex) you can put a lot more symbolism/meaning/substance in words. You can only put so much in one painting.

But from someone who's an artist, they could just flip it and say vice versa. I guess it all depends on your interest.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:27 PM   #22
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Nope. I don't understand damn thing about art. I don't see how one painting is better than the other. All I see is smeared paint. It looks like something my 5-Year Old Sister did in Class last week. Just smeared paint everywhere.

I know that it is supposed to be more than that, but I just don't have an eye for Art. I am not going to sit here and call Art bad, just because I don't understand it. I just think Art is not for me.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:46 PM   #23
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

So I understand that with some paintings it tells a story blah blah blah. Don't really see it, but I guess I can understand it. By the way, doesn't anyone feel like perhaps they can make that Van Gogh painting with a little training? I really don't see the genius. It's a painting of a guy...well he used brave colors...if he had used less color the artsy people would've said it showed his repressed emotion or some BS. No offense but that is how I (and perhaps other non-art people) see it.

But now here see this:



I'm not saying my little sister can make a better one in her fingerpainting class but god damn it I can't tell the difference. What are we really suppose to see here? Brave colors? Objects?

If any human being tell me they see something here I would feel that they are making up some BS. This is probably how non-art people feel. So art-people, do enlighten us.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:53 PM   #24
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamgine
So I understand that with some paintings it tells a story blah blah blah. Don't really see it, but I guess I can understand it. By the way, doesn't anyone feel like perhaps they can make that Van Gogh painting with a little training? I really don't see the genius. It's a painting of a guy...well he used brave colors...if he had used less color the artsy people would've said it showed his repressed emotion or some BS. No offense but that is how I (and perhaps other non-art people) see it.

But now here see this:



I'm not saying my little sister can make a better one in her fingerpainting class but god damn it I can't tell the difference. What are we really suppose to see here? Brave colors? Objects?

If any human being tell me they see something here I would feel that they are making up some BS. This is probably how non-art people feel. So art-people, do enlighten us.

I'm not an art person and I don't see any particular thing in this painting per se, but I do like the texture it conveys and the 3-D effect.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:54 PM   #25
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamgine
So I understand that with some paintings it tells a story blah blah blah. Don't really see it, but I guess I can understand it. By the way, doesn't anyone feel like perhaps they can make that Van Gogh painting with a little training? I really don't see the genius. It's a painting of a guy...well he used brave colors...if he had used less color the artsy people would've said it showed his repressed emotion or some BS. No offense but that is how I (and perhaps other non-art people) see it.
don't worry about it.

we artists understand that we are going to get all kinds of reactions, including contempt or non-plussedness. it goes with the territory.
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:05 PM   #26
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gigantes
don't worry about it.

we artists understand that we are going to get all kinds of reactions, including contempt or non-plussedness. it goes with the territory.

But what about when there's not contempt, what about genuine confusion? I seriously don't know what the hell I'm looking at in that picture.

To an elitist art buff, to an enlightened artist, it could be a map of the Underground Railroad and how it symbolized the struggle of slavery and the escape from it's confines, as you had no idea where the roads led, but they were all better than the dead end you were currently trapped in or some ****.

To me, it's nothing. Unless it's one of those optical illusions where you're supposed to relax your eyes and then you'll see the real picture. I could never ****ing get those things. Kinda like in Mallrats.
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:28 PM   #27
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

i don't know, i'm not a big pollack fan.
but i thought some of the scholars above had answered about him. or maybe i'm hallucinating.

one quick reaction about pollack is that he probably followed in dada-ist and pop art footsteps, pushing the boundaries of both. remember that art is also about pushing all rational boundaries of what the viewer can possibly appreciate, and people like pollack can thrive in that niche.

a piece of dogcrap mounted on a square of cardboard may be too much for even the most diehard art fan to appreciate, but a piece of dogcrap mounted on a square of cardboard that has been arranged in an unusual way might be just enough to teeter provocatively on the edge between 'art' and 'garbage', and that's what some artists aim for. the fact that some artists take enormous risks is highly appreciated by some folks.
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:34 PM   #28
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by InspiredLebowski
I've never really understood the outlandish prices of art. I mean, if it's something you like to look at, who cares who painted it or how much you paid for it? Dunno, just always gotten the vibe that it's this circle jerk for the bourgeoisie to one up one another. Guess my uncultured self just doesn't get it.

This reminds me of I think the Washington Post piece that had world renowned violinist Joshua Bell (a Hoosier, just sayin) set up on a subway platform playing some amazingly complex Vivaldi renditions during the middle of the work rush, looking like a commong street performer. Just a few people even paid him any mind. The point was to see where our priorities lie in the grand scheme of enjoying life, a stop and smell the roses type deal. At least that's the spin they put on it. I think it just shows a shift in what we consider worth stopping for, for better or worse. Best believe if it were Britney Spears or Metallica or something the majority would've stopped.

i read about that.. agree with this guy completely..
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:35 PM   #29
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamgine
So I understand that with some paintings it tells a story blah blah blah. Don't really see it, but I guess I can understand it. By the way, doesn't anyone feel like perhaps they can make that Van Gogh painting with a little training? I really don't see the genius. It's a painting of a guy...well he used brave colors...if he had used less color the artsy people would've said it showed his repressed emotion or some BS. No offense but that is how I (and perhaps other non-art people) see it.

But now here see this:



I'm not saying my little sister can make a better one in her fingerpainting class but god damn it I can't tell the difference. What are we really suppose to see here? Brave colors? Objects?

If any human being tell me they see something here I would feel that they are making up some BS. This is probably how non-art people feel. So art-people, do enlighten us.

I have a hypothesis. If a large amount of smart people do think something is valuable and has a lot of meaning while you don't....then you're probably just stupid.

I think this works for just about anything in life.

It's similar to how studies have proven decisions made by groups usually turn out better than decisions made by individuals. Translate that to this. The fact that many people think it's valuable trumps your opinion that it isn't. Thus, you need to find out why it is important.

Asking ISH is a start, but taking classes, reading up on it on your own time, asking experts, etc. would be advised. After this I can guarantee you, you'd not be saying things like "Ya, I get that some painting might tell a story blah blah blah, but it's still like so pointless to me."

Education defeats ignorance. Not attacking you. Just pointing out the obvious fact that you're ignorant to this form of art and honestly need to educate yourself about this art form to even begin to grasp why so many people value it. I'm sure you know this however.
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:36 PM   #30
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Default Re: Who here understand paintings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayGuevara
But what about when there's not contempt, what about genuine confusion? I seriously don't know what the hell I'm looking at in that picture.

To an elitist art buff, to an enlightened artist, it could be a map of the Underground Railroad and how it symbolized the struggle of slavery and the escape from it's confines, as you had no idea where the roads led, but they were all better than the dead end you were currently trapped in or some ****.

To me, it's nothing. Unless it's one of those optical illusions where you're supposed to relax your eyes and then you'll see the real picture. I could never ****ing get those things. Kinda like in Mallrats.

those were sick.. i had a space jam one like that when i was a kid.. the trick is to start with the picture right at your nose, stare hard at the center, and slowly bring it out.. works everytime
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