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Old 01-19-2011, 08:32 PM   #1
lbj4kb8
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Default Help with Statistic class

Hi guys, I'm stuck on a question for my statistics class. What the hell is the "scope" of a graph? I've discovered what the scale of a graph is, but can't seem to find the definition of a scope. I've tried googling for the answer with no luck. Any one here that can help me out would really be appreciated. Thanks!
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Old 01-19-2011, 08:39 PM   #2
Myth
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

What is the full question?

I'd assume it has something to do with how much the graph can tell you. Like, if a graph only showed you what is going on between -5 and 5, then everything between those are within the scope of the graph and determining what is going on at at say -28 is outside of the scope of the graph.
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Old 01-19-2011, 09:03 PM   #3
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

I think it means the same thing as domain of relevance or range.
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Old 01-19-2011, 09:58 PM   #4
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by Myth
What is the full question?

I'd assume it has something to do with how much the graph can tell you. Like, if a graph only showed you what is going on between -5 and 5, then everything between those are within the scope of the graph and determining what is going on at at say -28 is outside of the scope of the graph.

The question is: Is the scope and scale of the graph appropriate? Why or why not?

This assignment asked us to find our own scale and answer these set questions. I chose a multiple bar graph depicting the percentage of men and women developing cardiovascular disease.

Can you answer the question from this info?
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Old 01-19-2011, 09:59 PM   #5
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by shlver
I think it means the same thing as domain of relevance or range.

Thanks, but I have no idea what this meant haha..
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:02 PM   #6
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by lbj4kb8
Thanks, but I have no idea what this meant haha..
You don't know what range is?
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:04 PM   #7
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by shlver
I think it means the same thing as domain of relevance or range.
I think this, maybe scope is x and range is y or some shit. Been a long time since I did anything with a graph.
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:06 PM   #8
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by lbj4kb8
Thanks, but I have no idea what this meant haha..

i think it just means - is the range of values and the type of units shown on the graph acceptable to the display your data.

if you are measuring things in cm for instance and all of your data lies between 10 cm and 80 cm then there is no point having a graph that goes from 0 cm to 10000 cm. and second it'd be best to have your units scale as cm or mm, measuring in km or nano meters would be difficult to interpret.
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:07 PM   #9
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by hayden695
I think this, maybe scope is x and range is y or some shit. Been a long time since I did anything with a graph.
That's in geometry. In statistics, it means something different. Range in stats is more what Myth described.
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:10 PM   #10
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by shlver
That's in geometry. In statistics, it means something different. Range in stats is more what Myth described.
Ahh I see, sorry for polluting the thread I was just curious as well. I was thinking along the lines of what miller-time wrote.
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:16 PM   #11
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Based on that, I'd say it is likely asking for something that seems to combine what I said with what shlver said.

Seems like that type of question is asking: Is the graph scaled to an appropriate size considering the info. So if the range of data points on the graph goes from 0 through 8, yet the graph shows everything from -50 to 50, it seems like the scope is inappropriately large. If the graph has data points ranging from 0 through 1000, but you only show 0 through 10, then the scope of the graph is too small.

Here is my attempt to be more specific to a bar graph:
Lets say that your sample showed 8500 men had the disease and 8000 women had it. If you show a graph that shows 0 through 10000, the bars are going to look roughly the same. If the two numbers (8500 and 8000) are statistically significantly different yet appear to be roughly the same on the graph, it is likely that the scope of the graph is not zoomed in enough, and thus is an inappropriate scope. If you show say 6000 through 10000, the gap between men and women appears to be larger, and more accurately shows the difference.
On the flip side to that, lets say the numbers are 8004 men and 8001 women (I chose these numbers because they are likely to be not significantly different in a problem). If you zoom in showing the range of 8000 to 8005, it will appear that the disease is way more common in men than women (because men's bar would be towards the top of the graph and the women's bar towards the bottom). This would inappropriate give the impression of a large difference when really the difference is minuscule.

I'm not sure if this is exactly what it is asking (and it is especially hard not seeing the graph itself), but I hope this helps.
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:21 PM   #12
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by Myth
Based on that, I'd say it is likely asking for something that seems to combine what I said with what shlver said.

Seems like that type of question is asking: Is the graph scaled to an appropriate size considering the info. So if the range of data points on the graph goes from 0 through 8, yet the graph shows everything from -50 to 50, it seems like the scope is inappropriately large. If the graph has data points ranging from 0 through 1000, but you only show 0 through 10, then the scope of the graph is too small.

Here is my attempt to be more specific to a bar graph:
Lets say that your sample showed 8500 men had the disease and 8000 women had it. If you show a graph that shows 0 through 10000, the bars are going to look roughly the same. If the two numbers (8500 and 8000) are statistically significantly different yet appear to be roughly the same on the graph, it is likely that the scope of the graph is not zoomed in enough, and thus is an inappropriate scope. If you show say 6000 through 10000, the gap between men and women appears to be larger, and more accurately shows the difference.
On the flip side to that, lets say the numbers are 8004 men and 8001 women (I chose these numbers because they are likely to be not significantly different in a problem). If you zoom in showing the range of 8000 to 8005, it will appear that the disease is way more common in men than women (because men's bar would be towards the top of the graph and the women's bar towards the bottom). This would inappropriate give the impression of a large difference when really the difference is minuscule.

I'm not sure if this is exactly what it is asking (and it is especially hard not seeing the graph itself), but I hope this helps.
Repped. Articulated and expanded way more than my crappy reply. Even gave an answer for the "why" part of the question.
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:32 PM   #13
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by Myth
Based on that, I'd say it is likely asking for something that seems to combine what I said with what shlver said.

Seems like that type of question is asking: Is the graph scaled to an appropriate size considering the info. So if the range of data points on the graph goes from 0 through 8, yet the graph shows everything from -50 to 50, it seems like the scope is inappropriately large. If the graph has data points ranging from 0 through 1000, but you only show 0 through 10, then the scope of the graph is too small.

Here is my attempt to be more specific to a bar graph:
Lets say that your sample showed 8500 men had the disease and 8000 women had it. If you show a graph that shows 0 through 10000, the bars are going to look roughly the same. If the two numbers (8500 and 8000) are statistically significantly different yet appear to be roughly the same on the graph, it is likely that the scope of the graph is not zoomed in enough, and thus is an inappropriate scope. If you show say 6000 through 10000, the gap between men and women appears to be larger, and more accurately shows the difference.
On the flip side to that, lets say the numbers are 8004 men and 8001 women (I chose these numbers because they are likely to be not significantly different in a problem). If you zoom in showing the range of 8000 to 8005, it will appear that the disease is way more common in men than women (because men's bar would be towards the top of the graph and the women's bar towards the bottom). This would inappropriate give the impression of a large difference when really the difference is minuscule.

I'm not sure if this is exactly what it is asking (and it is especially hard not seeing the graph itself), but I hope this helps.

Wow, thanks! That's an excellent way of putting it so I can understand. Repped...
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:33 PM   #14
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Quote:
Originally Posted by shlver
You don't know what range is?

I know what it is now that Myth explained it. Thanks man.
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Old 01-19-2011, 11:29 PM   #15
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Default Re: Help with Statistic class

Glad I could help. Its sad that I take a break from my own school work and use that time to help somebody else with theirs
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