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Old 02-08-2007, 12:34 AM   #16
tpcslj47
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Default Re: 100 enough?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chairman_Yao
How effective are calf raises in increasing vertical jump?

Not very, definitely much less effective than most people would think. You would be far better off doing squats and deadlifts, assuming you are mature enough (physically) to begin weightlifting. I'd say 16 atleast.
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Old 02-08-2007, 06:11 AM   #17
orfeomorfeo-ita
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Default Re: 100 enough?

Quote:
Originally Posted by timmyD
i guess since im a kinesiology major i have some credibility in saying that QUADRICEPS ARE WHAT U NEED TO WORK OUT. calfs are like for all lateral movements. not for explosive power. u need to work on rim jumps and jump squats not calf raises if u are looking for MORE EXPLOSIVE POWER. i bet you didnt know vince carter squatted 520 before the 2000 olympics. how much can u squat? also think about this for people who wnat a dumed down reason why calf raisers are not what u need for vert. do u calf raise to jump? or do u squat? i hope u know that u squat. so work on doing squats movements to work on VERTICAL leap increase. calf raises are great for working on agility though


Are you really a kinesiology major suggesting an adolescent to use squats to improve his vertical reach, also mentioning in the same occasion that Carter squatted 520? Are you really wishing for his knee and lower back to crash in a few weeks?

I'll help you, so we'll avoid having a meniscus on our conscience.

Chairman_Yao: Squats are that exercise where, with or without an overweight on your shoulder (this overweight can get to be really huge while your strenght improves), you descend towards the ground, with your spine always perpendicular to the floor, and then get back up. (the feet are always still, with a distance between them of about the same there is between your shoulders. You have to execute the exercise always watching high, to avoid your back bending, which is wrong and dangerous. You have also to activate the muscles of your butt, that will help you keep stability and avoid, again, bending.
There are several number of variations for this exercise.. its effects depend on some parameters:

- knee angle: The more you let your bottom get near to the ground, the lesser the angle between your leg and thigh gets. Obviously, a longer movement is more stressing for the body, so at a time it's more training and more dangerous. The complete, or deep squat, is what you do when your butt almost touches the floor. It's hardly useful for jumping, because you never get so low during a jump. It's an important exercise for some throws in athletichs and weightlifting. The half squat stops when your thigh is parallel to the floor. The perpendicular stops when your knee is 90 flexed. The squat-jump stops somewhere between the half and the perpendicular, but you have to jump towards the ceiling after you finished getting back up.

- Overweight. It's obvious, the more weights you have on your shoulder, the more your muscular fiber is stressed, the more danger you put your tendons and ligamens in.

- Speed: as all strenght exercise, it's very important to execute them with the right speed and timing. For jumping purpose, it's always better to keep a high speed (and if necessary reducing the overweights) than viceversa.

If you are 16, it's a little early to start using overweights. But it's past time you learn the technique of the exercise. You could start executing half-squat-jumps with no overweights and your hands on your thighs, to start with. Next year, you could start trying a little overweight.. and _SLOWLY_ increase it while you grow up.

WATCH OUT. Squats with overweights are one of the most stressing exercise for the knees. I broke my right lateral meniscus when I reached too much overweight with the deep squat (one repetition for 120 Kg), when I was 19. They are dangerous not only for knee injuries, but also for "accidents". You can imagine that having even "only" your bodyweight on your shoulders and finding out, all of a sudden, that you're really tired, and that you're not able to get back up, isn't a good situation. When you'll want to learn to use overweights, you'll absolutely have to go to gym, or to a sport resort, where they have the structure to do it.
But still, learn other things. There are many ways to improve your strenght, and overweights are really not necessary right now.

orfeomorfeo

Last edited by orfeomorfeo-ita : 02-08-2007 at 06:34 AM.
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Old 02-08-2007, 08:24 PM   #18
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Default Re: 100 enough?

Quote:
Originally Posted by orfeomorfeo-ita
Are you really a kinesiology major suggesting an adolescent to use squats to improve his vertical reach, also mentioning in the same occasion that Carter squatted 520? Are you really wishing for his knee and lower back to crash in a few weeks?

I'll help you, so we'll avoid having a meniscus on our conscience.

Chairman_Yao: Squats are that exercise where, with or without an overweight on your shoulder (this overweight can get to be really huge while your strenght improves), you descend towards the ground, with your spine always perpendicular to the floor, and then get back up. (the feet are always still, with a distance between them of about the same there is between your shoulders. You have to execute the exercise always watching high, to avoid your back bending, which is wrong and dangerous. You have also to activate the muscles of your butt, that will help you keep stability and avoid, again, bending.
There are several number of variations for this exercise.. its effects depend on some parameters:

- knee angle: The more you let your bottom get near to the ground, the lesser the angle between your leg and thigh gets. Obviously, a longer movement is more stressing for the body, so at a time it's more training and more dangerous. The complete, or deep squat, is what you do when your butt almost touches the floor. It's hardly useful for jumping, because you never get so low during a jump. It's an important exercise for some throws in athletichs and weightlifting. The half squat stops when your thigh is parallel to the floor. The perpendicular stops when your knee is 90 flexed. The squat-jump stops somewhere between the half and the perpendicular, but you have to jump towards the ceiling after you finished getting back up.

- Overweight. It's obvious, the more weights you have on your shoulder, the more your muscular fiber is stressed, the more danger you put your tendons and ligamens in.

- Speed: as all strenght exercise, it's very important to execute them with the right speed and timing. For jumping purpose, it's always better to keep a high speed (and if necessary reducing the overweights) than viceversa.

If you are 16, it's a little early to start using overweights. But it's past time you learn the technique of the exercise. You could start executing half-squat-jumps with no overweights and your hands on your thighs, to start with. Next year, you could start trying a little overweight.. and _SLOWLY_ increase it while you grow up.

WATCH OUT. Squats with overweights are one of the most stressing exercise for the knees. I broke my right lateral meniscus when I reached too much overweight with the deep squat (one repetition for 120 Kg), when I was 19. They are dangerous not only for knee injuries, but also for "accidents". You can imagine that having even "only" your bodyweight on your shoulders and finding out, all of a sudden, that you're really tired, and that you're not able to get back up, isn't a good situation. When you'll want to learn to use overweights, you'll absolutely have to go to gym, or to a sport resort, where they have the structure to do it.
But still, learn other things. There are many ways to improve your strenght, and overweights are really not necessary right now.

orfeomorfeo

i never said to do 520, im telling u that a man who could jump over men when he was 21 or so squatted that much. do RIM JUMPS and JUMP SQUATS and BOUNDING LEAPS for vertical increase. 13 year olds shoud be careful with weights cuz it could mess up the alignment in your knees and back. just watch a football player in highschool walk haha. sort of funny how they are all hunced over and walk like penguins.
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Old 02-09-2007, 04:13 AM   #19
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Default Re: 100 enough?

now, that's better
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Old 02-11-2007, 04:30 PM   #20
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Default Re: 100 enough?

is this kid who even started this thread even read this anymore?

seems like were trying to help soemone who deosnt care
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