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Old 06-24-2006, 03:07 AM   #16
SupermanOnSteroids
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the new satellite radios.
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Old 06-24-2006, 03:07 AM   #17
B-Low
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Stars
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Old 06-24-2006, 03:09 AM   #18
HALLandOATES
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.Kizzle
Sh1t, I must have been a sleep in Science class.

I don't ever remember hearing about Sirius, Pullox, Arcturus, Rigel, Aldebaran, Betelgeus and Antares.

What exacly are they?

Me either, alls I remember in Earth Science in High School was simple sh!t like fault lines and phazes of the moon
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Old 06-24-2006, 03:25 AM   #19
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It's sad how GW Bush is ruining it all
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Old 06-24-2006, 03:29 AM   #20
Bosh4life
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Man i had no idea earth was so small comparibly to other planets.
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Old 06-24-2006, 03:35 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.Kizzle
Sh1t, I must have been a sleep in Science class.

I don't ever remember hearing about Sirius, Pullox, Arcturus, Rigel, Aldebaran, Betelgeus and Antares.

What exacly are they?
Stars...fortunately all very far from us.
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Old 06-24-2006, 03:57 AM   #22
Solid Snake
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My god imagine living on that big ass Antares. The size actually frightens me like a small child.
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Old 06-24-2006, 03:59 AM   #23
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that's like living on a sun son.
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Old 06-24-2006, 04:30 AM   #24
ClutchCityReturns
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First of all, I'm a firm believer that there is life in the universe beyond what we know, if for no other reasons than the odds simply being stacked against us being alone in such a huge ass universe. Seriously, as you can see from those comparisons, our planet is but a grain of sand on a beach. Maybe even smaller.

So what I was thinking is this...

Since there are other planets out there that are soooooo much bigger than Earth, what if the creatures that live on those planets are bigger too? I assume creatures on Earth are a certain size due mainly to the size of the planet (don't want it too crowded or we'd use up all the resources) and because of the gravitational pull we have here which makes it impractical to be huge. So what if some other planets that don't have such a strong gravitational pull, or whatever different kinds of differences are involved, makes it possible for creatures to grow proportionate to the size of their planet. I mean, it's not as extreme an example, but if an ant is 10,000 times smaller than a human, what keeps a creature on some other distant planet from being 10,000 times larger than us? Maybe even more than that. I guess what I'm saying is that when people think of life on other planets, they probably imagine things that are roughly the size of what we have here on Earth, but why does that have to be the case?

According to those comparisons, if a creature somewhere else in the universe had what we would consider relative size to his own planet, his right nut could be the size of Earth. That is, if they have balls there.

Space is crazy and so am I.

Last edited by ClutchCityReturns : 06-24-2006 at 04:32 AM.
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Old 06-24-2006, 04:33 AM   #25
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We would probally be the size of ants in those other places! **** imagine running from a giant foot like ants do to us everyday.
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Old 06-24-2006, 04:33 AM   #26
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Damn, I just realizad that Saiyans may exist.
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Old 06-24-2006, 06:06 AM   #27
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Quote:
The force of gravity on a planet is directly proportionate to its mass, so chances are the bigger planets will have a stronger gravitational pull. Therefore, it'd be even MORE impractical on these bigger planets to have bigger creatures. But who knows. We didn't used to think that creatures could live in the deep sea due to the extreme submarine-crushing water pressure, but sh1t lives down there, so you never know.

I was going to write something simular...

Concerning the sizes, I don't really think Betelgeuse is smaller than Antares and I'm sure that Aldebaran isn't bigger than or even equal to Rigel. Its radius is 50% of Rigel at best.

In solar diameters, Aldebaran is rated in the 35-40 range, Rigel is at 80, Anteres at 300 and Betelgeuse at 400-800 (variable size). There's a handful of stars even bigger, like Epsilon Aurigae and Mu Cephei, but I guess you ran out of fruit.
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Old 06-24-2006, 06:19 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShannonElements
But who knows. We didn't used to think that creatures could live in the deep sea due to the extreme submarine-crushing water pressure, but sh1t lives down there, so you never know.

I guess that's what I'm saying, but I guess I didn't type out the complete thought. We just don't know ANYTHING about what lies beyond where we can actually go. As crazy as it sounds, there may be parts of the universe where some wrinkle let's you travel back in time. Who are we to say it's not possible? So along the same line of thinking, creatures on another planet could be made up of matter that we don't even have here...something that could withstand pressure unlike anything we've ever experienced. It really does leave me speechless sometimes when I just stop and imagine the possibilities that are out there. It's equally exciting and depressing, because I want to know what's out there but I know I never will.

So in conclusion, it's quite possible that an alien space giant could carry our entire solar system in one of his seven nvtsacks

Last edited by ClutchCityReturns : 06-24-2006 at 06:22 AM.
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Old 06-24-2006, 06:40 AM   #29
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Quote:
Anything is possible. And our planet IS even smaller than a grain of sand on the beach in relation to the rest of the universe. Actually, it's nearly impossible to describe how small we are in infinity. The same could be said of the giant stars as well, however.

I once calculated by mind how big the universe would be if the earth was a grain of sand. I found a crazy number like 2 or 4 light years (don't remember the exact number). Maybe I'll calculate this again today.
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Old 06-24-2006, 07:12 AM   #30
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Quote:
The force of gravity on a planet is directly proportionate to its mass, so chances are the bigger planets will have a stronger gravitational pull. Therefore, it'd be even MORE impractical on these bigger planets to have bigger creatures. But who knows. We didn't used to think that creatures could live in the deep sea due to the extreme submarine-crushing water pressure, but sh1t lives down there, so you never know.

That's true, but mass isn't directly proportional to size. The density of the body would have a lot to do with it. A rock planet is far more dense than the gas planet, and therefore may have more mass despite it's smaller volume, making it's gravitational pull smaller.
The odds of their not being life somewhere else are almost a statistical impossibility. Making much of our human belief system seem egomaniacal. Which actually explains a lot of our problems as a species.
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