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Old 03-27-2013, 01:31 PM   #46
-p.tiddy-
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Default Re: Teach an old schooler about "Jorts"

humid weather is probably a different situation than an arid desert...idk

I'm sure they want some evaporation, but then again I am reading they wear multiple layers to stay cooler...

really this debate is pretty far off topic of "jorts" ...doesn't matter to anyone here

I was just stating what I remember being told, that's all...
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Old 03-27-2013, 01:49 PM   #47
Rake2204
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Default Re: Teach an old schooler about "Jorts"

Quote:
Originally Posted by -p.tiddy-
humid weather is probably a different situation than an arid desert...idk

I'm sure they want some evaporation, but then again I am reading they wear multiple layers to stay cooler...

really this debate is pretty far off topic of "jorts" ...doesn't matter to anyone here

I was just stating what I remember being told, that's all...
Yeah it's cool. I was just trying to explain how sweating works. Whether it be humid, arid, or whatever else, the body cools itself by having that sweat evaporated. If the process of evaporation is made more difficult, the body will struggle to cool itself. And a few things that will make evaporation more difficult include thick clothing that does not allow one's body to breathe and/or an environment that's already so full of moisture (aka humidity) that there's not a lot of room for the sweat on your skin to evaporate into the moist air.

In either instance, that will only lead to a greater body temperature and pose significant health risks. Keeping one's sweat on their own body (aka preventing it from evaporating) will not prevent dehydration. Again, it will only make someone hotter.

I think this all sort of ties in to this topic because there was a sentiment suggesting that wearing more may actually keep someone cooler than wearing less (aka shorts). I am disputing that claim in many instances. I believe people wear more in severe situations when they must protect themselves from the sun (or due to the manner of their work) but not to cool themselves down. What the folks in the desert did was create a best case scenario for themselves by protecting against sun damage while also allowing for adequate ventilation and evaporation.
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Old 03-27-2013, 01:51 PM   #48
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Default Re: Teach an old schooler about "Jorts"

Quote:
Originally Posted by andgar923
I own a pair of those, but its hard to find a pair I really like.

They're either very dorky looking, too thin, too high. If you want some that are a bit loose you have to buy them big, then I look like a 14 year old.

And those pockets are usually sucky. If you sit down then stand up, half of your shit inside falls out.

If it was up to me I'd wear nothing but basketball shorts, but I'd be underdressed and have my shit falling out all the time.
Same. Chino shorts never fit me right (6'5" 220) they're always so tight around the ass and thighs, or too baggy if I get a bigger size. Plus they never go down far enough to atleast the top of my kneecap.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:18 PM   #49
-p.tiddy-
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Default Re: Teach an old schooler about "Jorts"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rake2204
Yeah it's cool. I was just trying to explain how sweating works. Whether it be humid, arid, or whatever else, the body cools itself by having that sweat evaporated. If the process of evaporation is made more difficult, the body will struggle to cool itself. And a few things that will make evaporation more difficult include thick clothing that does not allow one's body to breathe and/or an environment that's already so full of moisture (aka humidity) that there's not a lot of room for the sweat on your skin to evaporate into the moist air.

In either instance, that will only lead to a greater body temperature and pose significant health risks. Keeping one's sweat on their own body (aka preventing it from evaporating) will not prevent dehydration. Again, it will only make someone hotter.

I think this all sort of ties in to this topic because there was a sentiment suggesting that wearing more may actually keep someone cooler than wearing less (aka shorts). I am disputing that claim in many instances. I believe people wear more in severe situations when they must protect themselves from the sun (or due to the manner of their work) but not to cool themselves down. What the folks in the desert did was create a best case scenario for themselves by protecting against sun damage while also allowing for adequate ventilation and evaporation.
yeah it is always severe situations...

http://www.lawnsite.com/archive/index.php/t-279330.html


^^^ rake that is good read on this subject by lawn workers in Florida

OP:

Quote:
Working outdoors in Florida for the last 14 years in a sleeveless shirt, I read somewhere that a longsleeve shirt would keep me cooler. Before I order new shirts, just wondering if anyone had any thoughts on this. Sleeveless or longsleeves

some of the responses:

Quote:
I'm in florida with you and I can tell you I wear only long sleeve shirts. When your skin gets burned it loses it's ability to cool itself off. Not to mention skin cancer. I'm sure a lot of guys will say short sleeves but this is just my opinion

Quote:
I know I need to switch to long sleeves some day... I'm 30 now, and my arms and hands are starting to look 40+. A couple years ago I made the switch to jeans only, no more shorts, and I've survived. Actually on the really hot sunny days I think it's BETTER than having the sun beating on my skin. Plus the chiggers and grass/weeds the trimmer throws on me dosn't bother me with long pants on. The next step is the sleeves. I think I'm probably too late to thwart skin cancer, but anything is better than nothing.

I also wear a wide brimmed hat.

Quote:
I started wearing long sleeved under armor (black) 1 1/2 years ago and you will never see me without it again. Keeps you cooler for sure.

James

etc

etc

I don't think they ever talk about sweat trapping be better, but it pretty clear that these guys learn quick that they can stay cooler by wearing more clothing.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:36 PM   #50
Rake2204
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Default Re: Teach an old schooler about "Jorts"

Quote:
Originally Posted by -p.tiddy-
yeah it is always severe situations...

http://www.lawnsite.com/archive/index.php/t-279330.html


^^^ rake that is good read on this subject by lawn workers in Florida

OP:



some of the responses:







etc

etc

I don't think they ever talk about sweat trapping be better, but it pretty clear that these guys learn quick that they can stay cooler by wearing more clothing.
Not to be difficult, but again, there's a big difference between wearing long sleeves for skin protection and wearing them to become cooler. That message board link is from a lawn care website where again, the biggest concern is protection from the sun. Their job is to be outside the entire day and as a result, such constant exposure to the sun would do terrible and painful damage to their skin. And yes, in that case, burned skin would in fact raise someone's body temperature, but fighting sun burn is different from the entire premise of sweating.

As such, they must cover up to protect their skin. From there, much of the thread seems to be discussing dri-fit materials that will allow them to cover their bodies while still allowing for a satisfactory amount sweat evaporation. Dri-fit attempts to lift sweat and push it to the outside, allowing it to make contact with the air and evaporate, thus cooling their body. Again, if sunburn were not an issue (aka if they were not spending 8 hours a day under the baking sun), and they didn't have to worry about sustaining injury from their job, I would trust that most of them would opt for more clothes.

I guess a good example would be a sauna, where there is no fear of skin damage via sun. If the goal were to stay as cool as possible in a sauna, do you believe folks would opt for more clothing, or less? Do you think you'd be healthier in a sauna wearing a towel? Or wearing jeans and a sweatshirt?

Last edited by Rake2204 : 03-27-2013 at 02:38 PM.
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