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Old 03-29-2014, 03:33 AM   #1
Lebron23
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Default Tear drop Shot

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eKwI45Xcjk
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:38 AM   #2
HylianNightmare
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

people hate if have this lol
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Old 03-29-2014, 03:06 PM   #3
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

I do this sometimes, I like it really nice to confuse people when they see the ball go up that high. I make most of them too.
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Old 03-29-2014, 04:38 PM   #4
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

I have always struggled with tear drops and floaters. Thankfully, standing at 6'3'' (6'4'' in shoes), I don't often face a lot of opponents that'd force me to go tear drop instead of going around, over, or through. I admit it'd be nice to have in my repertoire, but a part of me fears I'd use it too often, leading to a drop in aggressiveness.
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Old 03-29-2014, 07:25 PM   #5
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

When I started really playing about 4 years ago (at the age of 30) this was my go to shot. For some reason as my game has improved it seems like I'm not as good at floaters
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:49 PM   #6
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

This is my go to move.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:58 PM   #7
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

As goofy as it sounds, playing a lot of beer pong when i was younger really helped with my floaters/tear drops(that release and arc). i have the utmost confidence in them, and can pretty much hit them every time with my left hand while a defender is on me, and have worked in using my right hand (shooting hand), as well.
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Old 03-31-2014, 09:08 PM   #8
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

As a basketball coach I teach my players not to take running floaters. The only floater I allow my guards to practice are hop-step push-shot floaters ala Tony Parker. The truth is, you're better off setting your feet (hop-step), squaring up your shoulders, and taking a midrange jumper.
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Old 04-02-2014, 04:17 AM   #9
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdreason
As a basketball coach I teach my players not to take running floaters. The only floater I allow my guards to practice are hop-step push-shot floaters ala Tony Parker. The truth is, you're better off setting your feet (hop-step), squaring up your shoulders, and taking a midrange jumper.

I've been told the same thing by a very experienced coach. The problem is that it looks really easy and effective when you watch NBA players do it. But unless you're as good as these guys then you should rather stop and shoot a short jumpshot. Unfortunately I nevertheless tend to do floaters/tear drops and everytime I miss I tell myself not to do it again
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Old 04-02-2014, 06:50 AM   #10
01amberfirewv
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdreason
As a basketball coach I teach my players not to take running floaters. The only floater I allow my guards to practice are hop-step push-shot floaters ala Tony Parker. The truth is, you're better off setting your feet (hop-step), squaring up your shoulders, and taking a midrange jumper.


What grades do you coach? I am an assistant coach and was pretty surprised this season when our head coach (he has been in it for years) allowed it. It seems like something younger coaches allow and older coaches frown on
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Old 04-02-2014, 07:03 AM   #11
Jyap9675
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

Hmm I thought running floaters are fine, they're very similar to runners that Steve Nash uses. I use it when I dont have time for a hop step, but yes I do agree in a way that hop step floaters are more accurate.
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Old 04-02-2014, 08:23 AM   #12
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdreason
As a basketball coach I teach my players not to take running floaters. The only floater I allow my guards to practice are hop-step push-shot floaters ala Tony Parker. The truth is, you're better off setting your feet (hop-step), squaring up your shoulders, and taking a midrange jumper.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01amberfirewv
What grades do you coach? I am an assistant coach and was pretty surprised this season when our head coach (he has been in it for years) allowed it. It seems like something younger coaches allow and older coaches frown on
I have not noticed an age correlation with runners instruction. I personally do not teach runners because in my limited instruction time, I find it much more constructive to teach the more common and reliable plays in those situations. It's something I'm willing to assist with in individual breakdowns, but it's not a go-to in normal practices.

To be clear, I think runners and floaters are very nice weapons to have, but not in the place of a pull-up jumper or strong take to the rack. And unfortunately, over the years, I've had to spend a fair amount of time breaking players of their floater habits. They restrict themselves at times by settling for such a shot, when a finish at the rim is available and would be much more suitable and effective, no matter how legit they find their floater to be.

I also think it depends on the competition we're all facing - and how big we are- but in my pretty normal, mid-sized amateur surroundings - in high school, at the park, at the rec., there's just not the type of foreboding defensive presence that'd require the constant and regular use of a floater or runner. I think those shots are increasingly getting more play in college and the NBA because there's an overabundance of athletic seven footers with 35 inch verticals camping in the paint. Sometimes I think a teardrop floater with the shot clock winding down is the only option for a pro guard sometimes. In contrast, I think better shots are often available for regular folk.

TL;DR There's a time and a place for floaters and runners, but as a coach I find myself de-emphasizing them because many young players overuse them out of 1) a fear of contact/finishing strong/getting to the rim and 2) lacking the know-how in the pull-up game. So the idea, from a coaching perspective, is often to teach the more common and effective playstyles and let the floaters re-surface in the correct manner. Off the top of my head, the only two players in programs I've worked in over the past few years who used the floater correctly and effectively was a 5'8'' point guard and a 6'0'' mid-range deadeye who, again, preferred the pull-up but just happened to have many effective weapons.

Last edited by Rake2204 : 04-02-2014 at 08:33 AM.
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:12 AM   #13
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rake2204
I have not noticed an age correlation with runners instruction. I personally do not teach runners because in my limited instruction time, I find it much more constructive to teach the more common and reliable plays in those situations. It's something I'm willing to assist with in individual breakdowns, but it's not a go-to in normal practices.

To be clear, I think runners and floaters are very nice weapons to have, but not in the place of a pull-up jumper or strong take to the rack. And unfortunately, over the years, I've had to spend a fair amount of time breaking players of their floater habits. They restrict themselves at times by settling for such a shot, when a finish at the rim is available and would be much more suitable and effective, no matter how legit they find their floater to be.

I also think it depends on the competition we're all facing - and how big we are- but in my pretty normal, mid-sized amateur surroundings - in high school, at the park, at the rec., there's just not the type of foreboding defensive presence that'd require the constant and regular use of a floater or runner. I think those shots are increasingly getting more play in college and the NBA because there's an overabundance of athletic seven footers with 35 inch verticals camping in the paint. Sometimes I think a teardrop floater with the shot clock winding down is the only option for a pro guard sometimes. In contrast, I think better shots are often available for regular folk.

TL;DR There's a time and a place for floaters and runners, but as a coach I find myself de-emphasizing them because many young players overuse them out of 1) a fear of contact/finishing strong/getting to the rim and 2) lacking the know-how in the pull-up game. So the idea, from a coaching perspective, is often to teach the more common and effective playstyles and let the floaters re-surface in the correct manner. Off the top of my head, the only two players in programs I've worked in over the past few years who used the floater correctly and effectively was a 5'8'' point guard and a 6'0'' mid-range deadeye who, again, preferred the pull-up but just happened to have many effective weapons.


I'm not a coach but I totally agree. By using the floater you're not only giving away the chance for an higer percentage layup / pull up jumper but also the chance to get fouled.
Like you said this might make sense in the NBA with all the rim protection but it probably doesn't make sense in amateur basketball.
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:25 AM   #14
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by 01amberfirewv
What grades do you coach? I am an assistant coach and was pretty surprised this season when our head coach (he has been in it for years) allowed it. It seems like something younger coaches allow and older coaches frown on


I coach HS Varsity. It's not that I don't allow floaters/runners, but I certainly don't promote them. I would prefer my players either try to get all the way to the rim (even if it means getting blocked), or take a midrange jumper, which is typically wide open against zone defenses. I do allow my most skilled guards to practice floaters, but only the two-foot hop-step floaters where they can square their body to the hoop. Some players just don't feel comfortable taking jump-shots from close/midrange area, and I think it's actually a pretty effective shot in transition when the defense is retreating.
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Old 04-06-2014, 12:10 PM   #15
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Default Re: Tear drop Shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2swift4u
I'm not a coach but I totally agree. By using the floater you're not only giving away the chance for an higer percentage layup / pull up jumper but also the chance to get fouled.
Like you said this might make sense in the NBA with all the rim protection but it probably doesn't make sense in amateur basketball.

It think it just depends your percentage with it. Some people are money with it and it takes way less energy with less wear and tear on the body. It's the thinking man's shot.
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