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Old 07-17-2007, 07:43 PM   #1
D-Wade
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Default Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070717/...v9Cbc_Zxus0NUE

WASHINGTON - Al-Qaida is using its growing strength in Pakistan and Iraq to plot attacks on U.S. soil, heightening the terror threat facing the United States over the next few years, intelligence agencies concluded in a report unveiled Tuesday.

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At the same time, the intelligence analysts worry that international cooperation against terrorism will be hard to sustain as memories of Sept. 11 fade and nations' views diverge on what the real threat is.

In the report prepared for President Bush and other top policymakers, analysts laid out a range of dangers — from al-Qaida to Lebanese Hezbollah to non-Muslim radical groups — that pose a "persistent and evolving threat" to the country over the next three years.

The findings focused most heavily on Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida network, which was judged to remain the most serious threat to the United States. The group's affiliate in Iraq, which has not yet posed a direct threat to U.S. soil, could do just that, the report concluded. Al-Qaida in Iraq threatened to attack the United States in a Web statement last September.

The Iraqi affiliate also helps al-Qaida more broadly as it tries to energize Sunni Muslim extremists around the globe, raise resources and recruit and indoctrinate operatives — "including for homeland attacks," according to a declassified summary of the report's main findings.

In addition, analysts stressed the importance of al-Qaida's increasingly comfortable hideout in Pakistan that has resulted from a hands-off accord between Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf and tribal leaders along the Afghan border. That 10-month-old deal, which has unraveled in recent days, gave al-Qaida new opportunities to set up compounds for terror training, improve its international communications with associates and bolster its operations.

The assessment shows how the threat has changed.

Just two years ago, the intelligence agencies considered al-Qaida's various "franchises" decentralized offshoots, with bin Laden mostly providing ideological direction.

National Intelligence Council Chairman Thomas Fingar said his experts believe bin Laden and his top deputy are hiding in Pakistan. "There is no question that the ungoverned character of the space is a major factor in the Taliban's and al-Qaida's and other extremist groups' ability to hide — hide in plain sight," he said.

National Intelligence Estimates are the most authoritative written judgments of the 16 spy agencies across the breadth of the U.S. government. These documents reflect the consensus long-term thinking of top intelligence analysts.

Tuesday's publicly disclosed judgments are part of a more expansive, still-classified document, approved by the heads of all 16 intelligence agencies on June 21.

Analysts — who concluded the U.S. now faces a "heightened threat environment" — painted an increasingly familiar picture of al-Qaida: A group focused on high-profile attacks against political, economic and infrastructure targets, while striving to cause mass casualties and dramatic destruction.

FBI Deputy Director John Pistole said the bureau does not know of any al-Qaida cells in the United States, although his agents continue investigating such questions. The estimate said international counterterrorism efforts since 2001 have hampered al-Qaida's ability to attack the United States again, while also convincing terror groups that U.S. soil is a tougher target.

Charles Allen, the Department of Homeland Security's top intelligence official, said the department isn't changing the nation's threat level, which remains at yellow, or "elevated" — the middle of a five-point scale. Airlines remain one step higher, at orange.

Even as authorities warn of dangers in the U.S., analysts concluded the threat is more severe in Europe. The problem could touch the United States directly, Fingar noted, because of the ease of travel between Europe and here.

The White House sought to downplay the report's worries about the future of international counterterrorism cooperation. Bush's homeland security adviser, Frances Fragos Townsend, said the administration isn't concerned about being abandoned by allies. Cooperation is "actually as strong as it's ever been," she said.

The Bush administration also brushed off critics who say the administration released the intelligence estimate now to help its case as the Senate debates whether to withdraw troops from Iraq. White House press secretary Tony Snow said critics are "engaged in a little selective hearing ... to shape the story in their own political ways."

Meanwhile, Democrats said the report was proof that U.S. anti-terrorism efforts are being drained by the Iraq war.

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Ike Skelton, D-Mo., called on the U.S. to "responsibly redeploy" its troops from Iraq and turn security over to the Iraqis. "In hindsight, we should have concentrated our efforts on al-Qaida in Afghanistan from the beginning," he said.

Significant debate in recent weeks has focused on the genesis of the al-Qaida threat in Iraq and the nature of its links to al-Qaida's leaders. With the intelligence report's release, Bush sought to draw the threat in Iraq closer to bin Laden. "These people have sworn allegiance to the very same man who ordered the attack on September the 11th, 2001," he said.

At a briefing and in a later interview, Ted Gistaro, the national intelligence officer for transnational threats, said al-Qaida in Iraq did not have any active cells when the U.S. invaded in March 2003. He said the watershed moment was when its now-deceased leader, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, declared his allegiance to bin Laden in an October 2004 Internet message.

Beyond al-Qaida, the report also laid out three other potential terror threats to the country:

_Lebanese Hezbollah, a *****e Muslim extremist group, may be more likely to consider attacking here, especially if it believes the United States is directly threatening the group or its main sponsor, Iran.

_The number of homegrown extremists in the U.S. and its Western allies is growing, fueled by Internet web sites and anti-American rhetoric.

_So-called "single issue" terrorist groups probably will attack here on a smaller scale. They include white supremacists, anarchists and animal rights groups, such as Animal Liberation Front.

Last edited by D-Wade : 07-17-2007 at 09:10 PM.
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Old 07-17-2007, 07:52 PM   #2
Laker4Lyfe
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Wade
WASHINGTON - Al-Qaida is using its growing strength in Pakistan and Iraq to plot attacks on U.S. soil, heightening the terror threat facing the United States over the next few years, intelligence agencies concluded in a report unveiled Tuesday.

ADVERTISEMENT

At the same time, the intelligence analysts worry that international cooperation against terrorism will be hard to sustain as memories of Sept. 11 fade and nations' views diverge on what the real threat is.

In the report prepared for President Bush and other top policymakers, analysts laid out a range of dangers from al-Qaida to Lebanese Hezbollah to non-Muslim radical groups that pose a "persistent and evolving threat" to the country over the next three years.

The findings focused most heavily on Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida network, which was judged to remain the most serious threat to the United States. The group's affiliate in Iraq, which has not yet posed a direct threat to U.S. soil, could do just that, the report concluded. Al-Qaida in Iraq threatened to attack the United States in a Web statement last September.

The Iraqi affiliate also helps al-Qaida more broadly as it tries to energize Sunni Muslim extremists around the globe, raise resources and recruit and indoctrinate operatives "including for homeland attacks," according to a declassified summary of the report's main findings.

In addition, analysts stressed the importance of al-Qaida's increasingly comfortable hideout in Pakistan that has resulted from a hands-off accord between Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf and tribal leaders along the Afghan border. That 10-month-old deal, which has unraveled in recent days, gave al-Qaida new opportunities to set up compounds for terror training, improve its international communications with associates and bolster its operations.

The assessment shows how the threat has changed.

Just two years ago, the intelligence agencies considered al-Qaida's various "franchises" decentralized offshoots, with bin Laden mostly providing ideological direction.

National Intelligence Council Chairman Thomas Fingar said his experts believe bin Laden and his top deputy are hiding in Pakistan. "There is no question that the ungoverned character of the space is a major factor in the Taliban's and al-Qaida's and other extremist groups' ability to hide hide in plain sight," he said.

National Intelligence Estimates are the most authoritative written judgments of the 16 spy agencies across the breadth of the U.S. government. These documents reflect the consensus long-term thinking of top intelligence analysts.

Tuesday's publicly disclosed judgments are part of a more expansive, still-classified document, approved by the heads of all 16 intelligence agencies on June 21.

Analysts who concluded the U.S. now faces a "heightened threat environment" painted an increasingly familiar picture of al-Qaida: A group focused on high-profile attacks against political, economic and infrastructure targets, while striving to cause mass casualties and dramatic destruction.

FBI Deputy Director John Pistole said the bureau does not know of any al-Qaida cells in the United States, although his agents continue investigating such questions. The estimate said international counterterrorism efforts since 2001 have hampered al-Qaida's ability to attack the United States again, while also convincing terror groups that U.S. soil is a tougher target.

Charles Allen, the Department of Homeland Security's top intelligence official, said the department isn't changing the nation's threat level, which remains at yellow, or "elevated" the middle of a five-point scale. Airlines remain one step higher, at orange.

Even as authorities warn of dangers in the U.S., analysts concluded the threat is more severe in Europe. The problem could touch the United States directly, Fingar noted, because of the ease of travel between Europe and here.

The White House sought to downplay the report's worries about the future of international counterterrorism cooperation. Bush's homeland security adviser, Frances Fragos Townsend, said the administration isn't concerned about being abandoned by allies. Cooperation is "actually as strong as it's ever been," she said.

The Bush administration also brushed off critics who say the administration released the intelligence estimate now to help its case as the Senate debates whether to withdraw troops from Iraq. White House press secretary Tony Snow said critics are "engaged in a little selective hearing ... to shape the story in their own political ways."

Meanwhile, Democrats said the report was proof that U.S. anti-terrorism efforts are being drained by the Iraq war.

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Ike Skelton, D-Mo., called on the U.S. to "responsibly redeploy" its troops from Iraq and turn security over to the Iraqis. "In hindsight, we should have concentrated our efforts on al-Qaida in Afghanistan from the beginning," he said.

Significant debate in recent weeks has focused on the genesis of the al-Qaida threat in Iraq and the nature of its links to al-Qaida's leaders. With the intelligence report's release, Bush sought to draw the threat in Iraq closer to bin Laden. "These people have sworn allegiance to the very same man who ordered the attack on September the 11th, 2001," he said.

At a briefing and in a later interview, Ted Gistaro, the national intelligence officer for transnational threats, said al-Qaida in Iraq did not have any active cells when the U.S. invaded in March 2003. He said the watershed moment was when its now-deceased leader, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, declared his allegiance to bin Laden in an October 2004 Internet message.

Beyond al-Qaida, the report also laid out three other potential terror threats to the country:

_Lebanese Hezbollah, a *****e Muslim extremist group, may be more likely to consider attacking here, especially if it believes the United States is directly threatening the group or its main sponsor, Iran.

_The number of homegrown extremists in the U.S. and its Western allies is growing, fueled by Internet web sites and anti-American rhetoric.

_So-called "single issue" terrorist groups probably will attack here on a smaller scale. They include white supremacists, anarchists and animal rights groups, such as Animal Liberation Front.

This can't be true... Our troops are fighting in Iraq right now so that this wont happen. Don't you listen to the President? "We are fighting them over there, so we don't have to fight them here" What about that don't you understand? They are all in Iraq fighting.
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Old 07-17-2007, 08:05 PM   #3
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

Al Qaida will not succeed.


think about it this way:


why did the White House release this?


It can only be one of two things:


1) propaganda

2) admission of failure overseas
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Old 07-17-2007, 08:24 PM   #4
SecondFiddle
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

WMD likely in Iraq Intel says....
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Old 07-17-2007, 08:34 PM   #5
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laker4Lyfe
This can't be true... Our troops are fighting in Iraq right now so that this wont happen. Don't you listen to the President? "We are fighting them over there, so we don't have to fight them here" What about that don't you understand? They are all in Iraq fighting.

ya, but did you not read the article? Al-qaeda in pakistan is what needs to be focused on more.

Yo you need to provide the link for this article though.

But what you said is a very ignorant statement of believing everything that the government tells you.

Last edited by Hawker : 07-17-2007 at 08:39 PM.
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Old 07-17-2007, 08:46 PM   #6
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laker4Lyfe
This can't be true... Our troops are fighting in Iraq right now so that this wont happen. Don't you listen to the President? "We are fighting them over there, so we don't have to fight them here" What about that don't you understand? They are all in Iraq fighting.

George Bush is a moron. This is all to keep the US public scared. Cant wait til hes out of office.

jk fbi people.
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Old 07-17-2007, 09:09 PM   #7
D-Wade
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawker
ya, but did you not read the article? Al-qaeda in pakistan is what needs to be focused on more.

Yo you need to provide the link for this article though.

But what you said is a very ignorant statement of believing everything that the government tells you.

Just edited it on now
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:20 PM   #8
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

whatever, just a couple days ago when Michael Chertoff said he had a gut feeling there would be an attack they leaked info that said there is no credible evidence of an attack to cover his ass.

This is nothing more than the typical raising the terror level to orange when they want to frighten bumpkins into voting their way tactic they have used all along.

These NeoCon freaks that have hijacked the Republican party are all about fear and lies.

Remember the "We don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud" (on Iraq having MWDs)?

Thats clearly playing into a Sum of All Fears scenario and they do it over and over and over.

We never finished in Afghanistan either. Its the forgotten war. We have a bunch of soldiers over there getting ignored in what SHOULD have been the main focus post 9/11. Now all we have done is taken out the one country that kept Iran busy and in check and created a haven for terrorists to train in homemade weapons and guerrilla attacks while letting Al Qaeda rebuild. On top of that we look to Arabs like we are trying to pick up Britain's old colonial pieces as our property.

Last edited by kentatm : 07-17-2007 at 10:26 PM.
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:21 PM   #9
Randy
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

Quote:
Originally Posted by VCDrivesAPorscheToWork
Al Qaida will not succeed.


think about it this way:


why did the White House release this?


It can only be one of two things:


1) propaganda

2) admission of failure overseas

3. Scare tactics = control
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:53 AM   #10
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

I wouldn't be surprised if the government actually funds Al Queda, or is associated with them in some way. Some of the stuff that goes behind closed doors is sickening.
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:59 AM   #11
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Default Re: Al-Qaida likely to attack US, intel says

misdirection.


this little tid bit locks the us in iraq for another year.
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