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Old 06-14-2010, 04:02 PM   #2
Posterize246
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: North Philly, PA
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Default Re: Situational Statistics: Power Forwards (good read)

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Larry Sanders stacks up pretty well with Ed Davis at 1.03 PPP on 13 possessions per-game. Heís come a long way from his freshman year, and it shows in his situational statistics. His 55.3% shooting from the post (4th) is incredible considering how raw he was with his back to the basket when he got to VCU. He still has a ways to go, as his 0.421 PPP in jump shooting situations indicates his lack polish from the midrange, but couple his length and athleticism with his 1.421 PPP in finishing situations (3rd) and Sanders seems like a nice long-term option for a team with the time develop him.

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Charles Garcia may be maligned for his intangibles and the way he finished the year for Seattle, but he ranks second here in usage (21.2 Pos/G), and yielded a free throw on more possessions than anyone in our rankings (24.1%). His 0.909 PPP isnít too impressive, but his size and ability to play multiple positions make him one of the most intriguing boom or bust prospects in the draft.

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Gani Lawal doesnít really stand out in any one area, with a 0.913 overall PPP. His usage was actually higher than that of teammates Derrick Favors at 13.6 possessions per-game. With nearly 50% of his usage coming from post-ups and 16.5% from offensive rebounds, Lawal will benefit from playing with a true point guard at the next level and did manage to draw free throws on 21.1% of his possessions (3rd).

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Jarvis Varnado has made a lot of progress since he arrived at Mississippi State. His 1.03 PPP ranks well above average, and his 13.4% shots-fouled percentage ranks first in our entire sample. Varnado took less jump shots than any other player in our sample (0.4 Shots/G), but he made 51.6% of his shots from the post, where he spent the third largest percentage of his usage (46.3%).

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Craig Brackins took a step back from his 0.9 overall PPP ranking last in this yearís rankings, to 0.86 per-possessions this year. Much like Michael Washington, he didnít do much to help himself with another season in school, but nearly 40% of Brackinsí shots were jumpers and ranked second in post up possessions per-game at 6.9 each contest. The diversity of his game is intriguing for a player his size, but his polish still leaves a lot to be desired.

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Pablo Aguilar has the second lowest PPP in our ranks (0.872) and shot just 36.5% from the field for CB Granada in the ACB this season. His 1.11 PPP in spot-up situations ranks third in our standings and reinforces the notion that Aguilarís best asset is his ability to stretch the floor. His 38.5% shooting as a finisher is a good representation of how the European game impacts a playerís efficiency at the basket.

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Latavious Williams is unsurprisingly the second lowest player in our rankings in usage (7.8 possessions per-game), but he finished at a well above average 66.1% clip at the rim against NBADL competition. Heís limited in spot up situations, and got a meager 0.6 post up possessions per-game, showing that he still has a ton of room to grow. Heís a player to keep an eye on, as the viability of prep-to-D-League jumps will hinge on his selection and performance in coming seasons.

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Luke Harangody made a concerted effort to become more perimeter-oriented this season. His 5.3 jump shots per-game rank first on our list in a tie with Craig Brackins. Harangodyís overall PPP of 0.971 is just average because of his questionable shooting (38.1%) on those attempts.

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Dwayne Collins turns the ball over as often as anyone on our rankings, but also shoots 60.8% from the field and gets fouled on 21.7% of his shots. A highly aggressive and extremely strong big man, it should come as no surprise that Collins has performed well in workouts.

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Gavin Edwards ranks second in overall PPP (1.06), but is one of the lowest usage players in our rankings at 9.6 possessions per-game. His role as a complementary player at UConn afforded him some success on paper, but he turned the ball over at a high rate for a roleplayer (16.5%), even if he did manage to compensate by getting fouled on 11.3% of his shots (8th).
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