View Single Post
Old 01-03-2012, 05:14 PM   #3
Rake2204
7-time NBA All-Star
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 12,510
Rake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginableRake2204 is the Michael Jordan of posters with the best reputation imaginable
Default Re: The hesitation pull up

I'm a big fan of the hesitation pull-up. I'd say Chauncey Billups has been my biggest influence in terms of implementing the move into my own game. Through his career in Detroit, he seemed to make a living off of the hesitation and pull. It was his go-to move in nearly any clutch situation. Here's a quick look at Chauncey's: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_X2_pSVSjKU

In terms of usage, I like to keep my options open. Most often, I don't like executing a move that only has one possible option. Instead, I try to respond to how the defense is reacting to a move or how I think they'll be reacting to a move. For instance, I will not perform a hesitation and shoot no matter what. I may hesitate with the intention to shoot, but if a defender's sitting on it, I may forge that hesitation into a drive attempt instead (or maybe reset). It's a similar concept to what Ai2death mentioned with his step-back.

Now, on the topic of stepbacks, they can certainly be effective, but we can't expect them to always be effective. Again, I keep in mind my stepback can lead to a jumper, or it can just be a setup for my next move. In terms of creating an effective step-back, it could definitely take a significant amount of practice. The two toughest parts of mastering (or working toward mastering) my step-back were reminding myself to 1) Stay low and 2) Set my feet before shooting. Too often, strangely enough, it seems like we treat the step-back itself as the move, then everything that comes next as merely an after thought. After a step-back dribble, I think:

1) Stay Low
2) Regain Balance
3) Set Feet/Get to Shooting Pocket

Further, I find the best time to use a variable form of a step back is when I have a defender leaning rather heavily on the dribble drive. From there, if I execute some sort of primary move toward the basket, I'll react to my defender's response. If he dropped toward the paint in hopes of beating me to a spot (or even if his body weight is shifted backward), I may look into a pull up or step-back. If the defense recovers especially quickly, it's a good idea to keep the drive-to step-back-back to drive move in the back of your head. Basically, there's a ton of options.
Rake2204 is online now   Reply With Quote