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Old 01-03-2012, 05:57 PM   #17
Rake2204
7-time NBA All-Star
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 12,259
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Default Re: Shot consistantly comes up short

Everyone's different, but I have not often experienced a direct correlation between my shot accuracy and my weight lifting regime (whether it be with light weights or heavy). And again, there's no way of me knowing your problem, but I'll throw out two of my culprits when I find my shot is coming up short:

1) Legs: It's already been mentioned in this thread in 70% of the responses but it bears repeating. I'll sometimes fall into the "Shootaround" trap. That means, when I'm warming up by myself, I might go into a lull of sorts where, instead of firing game shots, I'm sort of shooting half-speed shots where I'm relatively flat-footed and short-armed. Of course, over time, the flat-footed nature of my warm-ups can sink into my in-game shooting.

Further, oddly enough there are times where I've found my release has unintentionally slowed down. This slowed down release, obviously, also resulted in my shots coming up short. The solution, once I recognized the issue, was simply to attempt to re-gain a quicker release. Physically, when looking to project an object, the speed at which force is projected will alter the outcome on a variable scale. In essence, perhaps you could try going through your own personal shooting process, but just at a slightly quicker rate of speed.

2) Arm Location: I've fallen victim to this issue only because it's so often been preached strongly in the other direction. Since childhood, I've always been told good shooters don't shoot from the waist. As such, I've found I sometimes begin my shooting process a little too high which then, again, results in my shot coming up short. My solution then is to try starting my shot a little lower than usual, just to see what happens. Often, it fixes the issue and is still not close to being a threat to get blocked.
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