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Old 06-15-2012, 10:03 AM   #53
Thorpesaurous
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Default Re: Basketball coaching discussion

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillyJakk
10th Grade & Under AAU.

Most of the kids are underclassmen (8th/9th graders) who play up so they'll be
more adjusted to the speed of the Varsity level HS game.

I'm always explaining (I'm sure to the point that they turn a deaf ear to me) why they're doing what they're doing, in hopes that they'll learn from it. Most cases they do.

Instead of face up defense, I teach my guys to play their man to his weak hand (which helps us force to's) simply because most guys their age (sometimes even to the professional levels) can't dribble as well w/ their off hand, ie., play a lefty to his right, play a righty to his left. There are some instances where lefties like to go right (like Manu) and some righties like to go left (like Durant) and some guys can just flat out handle the ball w/ both hands so we make adjustments accordingly.

Once gametime comes, they're usually on the bench saying "Oh, I see what you sayin', he can't go left, make him go left" and like clockwork the kid they're guarding starts turning over the ball.

The hardest part is getting guys to use their minds cause most of the game is all mental, once they do they'll be better players.

Anyway, back to the drills thing, I just think things like 3 man weave are useless cause there is never ever a situation in an actual game where guys will fastbreak in that fashion unless you're playing the Harlem Globetrotters.

I detest and stay away from things that are not actual basketball game related. I teach my guys to close out w/ poise, not "ball ball ball", and some don't get it now cause of how they were and are still being taught but the ones that get it tell me and show me all the time cause I see their game expanding.

What age group do you coach?



I also teach a directional defensive approach, although mine is more geared toward where the help is coming from and understanding what our whole defensive approach is. I have calls for traps in different spots that sometimes require funnells to the middle, other times to the baselines, and other times only to one baseline corner, so everyone is supposes to funnell to that side until it gets there.

Even if it doesn't work, my feeling is that getting kids to think about the game as a whole is a great approach. However it's still critical to devote time to individual skills. I wish I had more practice time.

I actually have this theory that kids today are better fundamentally, but have a much lesser feel for the scope of the game as a whole. And I think it's the result of the cheap and readily available hoops with the wheels. Kids shoot all the time. They'll even play horse, or double bounce, or rough, or even an occasional one on one or two on two with their neighborhood buddies. But the culture of heading up to a playground and fitting in, playing a role, and communicating seems to be worse than it was when I was a kid.
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