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Old 09-09-2012, 07:31 PM   #14
NotYetGreat
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Join Date: May 2009
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Default Re: Basketball player diets?

I'll be honest, the one thing that makes gaining muscle hard is practicing your sport. Of course, being a basketball athlete, your priority should definitely be your skills and traits needed in your sport (shooting, dribbling, defense, conditioning, etc). Having a good amount of time focused there will take away time AND energy (energy being incredibly important here because you don't grow while you lift. You grow while you RECOVER - food, sleep, & stress management) in order for you to pursue other physical shizznits.

One thing you could do though if you're a bit short on time is do ladders. Since your legs get pretty worked during practice, I guess you could give them some rest and work your upper instead. Now, back to ladders, basically it's starting from 1 rep, resting a bit, then continually adding reps until you reach a point just BEFORE failure. If you had to grind out the last rep, stop.

1
Rest
2
Rest
3
Rest
....

What's nice about this is it lets you add volume without overly stressing or fatiguing you, and from the sound of your sched you need to be fresh A LOT (and you also got to keep them grades in check, li'l man. Moral obligation since I'm a future teacher haha). If I were you I'd alternate between the push-ups and chin-ups. I assume you find push-ups much easier, so what you could do is do a couple reps, say 2, then 1 rep for chin-ups. The next "step" on the ladder will be 4 push-ups and 2 chin-ups, then so on and so forth. Regardless of when you do this, the important thing to remember is to EAT LIKE A FRICKING HORSE AFTER. Like I said earlier (opinion-based though so you don't necessarily have to do what I do), breakfast is not the most important meal of the day. It's whatever meal you have after some intense physical activity.
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