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Old 02-27-2010, 03:08 AM   #1
Undisputed
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Default Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireStory?id=9962908



Good, wait no, GREAT for the Bobcats. You now have an owner who will be completely driven to win a championship.
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Old 02-27-2010, 09:08 AM   #2
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

VERY nice headline to wake up to! I think Postolos would have blown up the team (not to mention no more Larry Brown) and I want to see this group succeed.

Awesome news!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 02-27-2010, 02:20 PM   #3
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~spectre~
VERY nice headline to wake up to! I think Postolos would have blown up the team (not to mention no more Larry Brown) and I want to see this group succeed.

Awesome news!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Old 02-27-2010, 02:52 PM   #4
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

Not too confident in MJ's management skills.....
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Old 02-27-2010, 03:18 PM   #5
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

He's done a decent job so far with this team. His only gaffe was the Morrison drafting and we've fixed that.

I think now that Jordan is a majority owner, he can have more influence on guys that come to play for us. He can say, "Hey, I'm MJ, only the greatest player ever, you wanna come play for me?"
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Old 03-01-2010, 12:53 PM   #6
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

What, if any, changes will we see now with MJ as majority owner? A name change? I hope not. We're already the Bobcats. Anything else?
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Old 03-12-2010, 02:00 PM   #7
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

March 12, 2010
NBA: Expect approval of Bobcats' sale next week

By Rick Bonnell

rbonnell@charlotteobserver.com

Michael Jordan’s $275 million purchase of the Charlotte Bobcats should be approved by the NBA by the end of next week, Commissioner David Stern told the Charlotte Observer Friday morning.

Speaking publicly for the first time since Jordan agreed to buy control of the team from Bob Johnson, Stern pegged the price at $275 million - $25 million less than Johnson originally agreed to pay for the expansion franchise in 2002.

In a telephone interview, Stern said that drop in value is appropriate, due to the circumstances.

"I think it’s fair to say it’s struggled in Charlotte,’’ Stern said. "There was a late start on the building’s naming rights and the local cable deal. It didn’t start as well as we would have liked or Bob Johnson would have liked.

"Between that and the general state of the economy, it was appropriately priced - $275 million is the right ballpark price of it.’’

Stern said part of the league’s incentive for a quick approval process is Jordan’s urgency to start fixing things. Stern said Jordan told him emphatically during a recent meeting that he’ll put in the time and focus to address what ails a team in the bottom third of the NBA in attendance.

"He has a vision of making this back into a community asset,’’ Stern said. "He considers himself a native of North Carolina, even though I tease him about being born in Brooklyn, and he’s a pretty competitive person. He knows he can add value to that franchise, to continue its growth.’’

Jordan has not spoken publicly since agreeing at nearly midnight Feb. 26 to buy the franchise from Johnson, risking his own wealth that he can reinvigorate a franchise losing tens of millions annually.

Previous to this, Jordan was a minority owner, with oversight of basketball operations.

"Without question, that is his plan,’’ Stern said, when asked if Jordan is prepared to spend dramatically more time on the Bobcats. "To do whatever it takes to improve the team as a community asset.

"The naysayers will be very pleasantly surprised.’’

Stern confirmed that Johnson had a written agreement to sell the team to a group led by former Houston Rockets president George Postolos, had Jordan allowed his exclusive window to buy the team expire on Feb. 27.

Despite an improved product – the Bobcats would make the playoffs for the first time if the season ended today – the team has struggled financially, particularly in its ability to sell the most expensive seating in the lower bowl of Time Warner Cable Arena. Stern said Jordan and his executives are receptive to any help the league office can provide in improving the business-side operations.

It’s been an odd road for NBA basketball in Charlotte since the Hornets arrived in 1988. The Hornets regularly led the league in attendance, then the Hornets left in an arena dispute, then Johnson and the city never really clicked.

Stern said he still believes Charlotte can be a great NBA market.

"The embrace of the NBA by Charlotte was an extraordinary thing,’’ Stern said. "We tried very hard to return that embrace. So much so that we’ve been accused of returning too soon’’ between the time the Hornets left for New Orleans and the Bobcats started play.

"We know Charlotte is a major-league city and that North Carolina is a great basketball state. We think Michael Jordan is the right owner to make all that work again.’’

Stern said there are no unresolved issues – such as Jordan’s connections to Nike’s Brand Jordan – that have been unresolved in his approval process. That’s because most of those issues were addressed when Jordan was vetted as a minority owner.

So will having an iconic player as its owner make it any easier for the Bobcats to attract free agents and build toward a championship?

"I don’t see it as an advantage or a disadvantage,’’ Stern said. "If his presence makes that into a premier franchise, then players will want to be there. His name alone won’t do that.

"But I believe he will have that impact’’ to make the Bobcats a premier organization.
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Old 03-19-2010, 08:06 PM   #8
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

Quote:
Originally Posted by LJJ
Not too confident in MJ's management skills.....

This is a definite concern, but Jordan's presence and ownership by itself is a DEFINITE plus for this franchise. I think this change in ownership will build our fanbase and it obviously is something the players can be proud of and keeps Larry Brown content.

If Jordan wasn't our owner, I'd be concerned about the future of this club. I think we can breathe a little knowing we have an owner who cares more about winning than the bottom line from a financial/value perspective.

... but yeah you're right, his management skills are questionable.
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Old 03-19-2010, 08:32 PM   #9
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

I'm also curious... what percentage of ownership is Jordan? 51%?
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Old 03-20-2010, 10:55 AM   #10
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

According to him 80%, and Johnson still has some stake as a minority owner.
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Old 03-31-2010, 06:36 AM   #11
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

Nice to see him comng to most of the games still. Seems animated and to care whenever he's shown on broadcast though no idea how contolled that exposure is, he seems more active than most owners who if their shown are usually talking not engrossed in the game.

Was talking to a friend about the free agency stuff this year and we agreed obviously the likes of Lebron have 0% chance of coming to Charlotte. When we said about the likeyhood of where a player who wants a sign and trade could wind up though my heart leapt. Why would Toronto let Bosh, or Miami let Wade (maybe Jordan's favourite) go to a NY or Washington who have 0 to send back and why would they go to a big franchise like NY or Nets etc which would be even further depleted by the deal. Obviously Chicago sending Deng out gives something back though not a great player or contract, and would appeal as a place to play for personel and market/history reasons. I think the likes of the Clippers and us though would be able to get in on a sign and trade too.

Send ageing but still quality SJax plus Diaw to Miami for Wade? Much better than what they could get elsewhere surely? Gives us better scorer and frees TT as starter. I'd go crazy. If Wade likes Jordan so much and Jordan's Nike brand could make alot of money for the pair of them outside the game if they teamed up, could it happen? Less likely do SJax and TT for Bosh or Stoudemire though think they're the one's whom one of will go to Chicago when most big names stay home for the money. Discuss yet again lol
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Old 04-15-2010, 10:03 AM   #12
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/15/sp.../15jordan.html

Quote:
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Whenever cigar smoke wafts through the door and floats over the cubicles where various Charlotte Bobcats employees work, it means the boss is in. Michael Jordan’s office sits close to an exit, and from there he can easily step outside to a balcony and gaze down to where the Charlotte Bobcats, the team he recently purchased for $275 million, practice on the floor of the Time Warner Cable Arena.
Michael Jordan joined Gerald Wallace and other members of the Bobcats on the bench during a game in early March.


In some ways, the smoke was a perfect metaphor for Jordan, who, until recently, had not been all that visible in the four years he has been a member of the Bobcats’ hierarchy. Take, for instance, the team photos that hang on the corridor walls outside Jordan’s office. From year to year, the cast of faces changes, with one constant: Jordan’s is nowhere to be seen.
Although he is the most iconic and marketable player in N.B.A. history, Jordan, 47, essentially stayed away from the spotlight since arriving in Charlotte in 2006 as a minority owner and the managing member of basketball operations. He was not asked to be in the forefront, and he did not want to be.
But he did field phone calls at all hours from his chosen general manager, Rod Higgins. Sometimes, Jordan made judgments about team personnel but left it to others to publicly explain them. He was here for Bobcats games more than most people realized, but he often pinned himself to the back of his suite, out of sight of the cameras and the fans.
Gradually, there was a shift. Jordan moved from his suite to the seats, paying $1,500 a game for two courtside chairs. Then, last month, his visibility soared when he became the first former N.B.A. player to buy a majority interest in an N.B.A. franchise.
Jordan’s money is now on the table, backing a belief that he can increasingly fill the arena with fans and victories. There is reason for guarded optimism on both fronts. The Bobcats are playoff-bound for the first time in their six-year history, and Jordan has pledged his involvement in the form of $275 million.
“It makes the statement about how serious my commitment is,” he said in a recent telephone interview, referring to his outlay. “I’ve always been an ambitious person, and this is something I envision seeing my children being a part of.”
Jordan’s decision to buy the Bobcats comes at a time of movement in N.B.A. ownership. The Russian billionaire Mikhail D. Prokhorov is set to acquire the Nets. Chris Cohan recently stated his intentions to sell the Golden State Warriors. George Shinn may soon sell the New Orleans Hornets. The deaths of Abe Pollin, the owner of the Washington Wizards, and Bill Davidson, the Detroit Pistons’ owner, will cause shifts within those franchises.
But it is Jordan who will attract a good deal of the attention.
“There are a lot of people watching him, and it’s going to be an interesting situation, both for himself and the league,” N.B.A. Commissioner David Stern said. “I believe that Mr. Jordan will ultimately be viewed as a very astute buyer.”
Jordan appears confident and hardly concerned that he is again putting his post-playing legacy on the line. His first job as an N.B.A. executive ended acrimoniously in 2003, when Pollin dismissed him as the Wizards’ director of basketball operations. The decision stunned Jordan, although the team was a cumulative 110-179 while he was there and there was evidence of team dissension.
One columnist in The Washington Post wrote: “After this performance, Jordan doesn’t need to be the president of anything. He needs a junior executive training seminar.” But another wrote, “He was the only reason people started to care about the Wizards again, the only credibility and legitimacy the whole operation had.”
Pollin cited a fracture between players on the team and Jordan after he came out of retirement to play for the Wizards for two seasons, 2001-2 and 2002-3, while still making personnel decisions. In some ways, his tenure is best remembered for his using the first overall selection in the 2001 draft on the high schooler Kwame Brown, who turned out to be a bust.
“You can have an idea on how things should go and people can disagree and they can go in another direction,” Jordan said. “It happened to me in Washington.”
Fred Whitfield, a longtime friend of Jordan’s who was the Wizards’ director of player personnel and is now the Bobcats’ chief executive, argued that only one of the first nine picks in that 2001 draft, Pau Gasol, developed into an All-Star. Few remember, he said, that Jordan cleared the Wizards’ payroll of the bloated salaries of Juwan Howard, Mitch Richmond and Rod Strickland.
“That’s what we were really challenged to do,” Whitfield said. He described Jordan as “intense in Washington” while learning the business side of basketball and said that it was then that Jordan started thinking about becoming a majority owner.
Before he joined the Wizards, Jordan had tried to buy a substantial interest in the Charlotte Hornets, but talks fell apart when Shinn would not relinquish control over basketball decisions. As a member of the Wizards, he was a minority owner until he had to relinquish his share when he came out of retirement. After leaving the Wizards, Jordan headed a group that nearly acquired the Milwaukee Bucks before United States Senator Herb Kohl decided to keep them.
In 2006, the Bobcats’ owner, Robert L. Johnson, coaxed Jordan into coming aboard as a minority owner and top executive. They first met through the actor Denzel Washington, a mutual friend, while Jordan was playing in Chicago.
“Michael got a little bit frustrated,” Johnson said of Jordan’s failed talks with Kohl to buy the Bucks. “It led to his hiatus of wanting to be separate from the N.B.A. until I kept convincing him to come to Charlotte. Basketball is in his blood. You can only play so much golf.”
Jordan quickly placed longtime associates in significant roles in Charlotte’s front office: Whitfield; Higgins, who was his assistant general manager in Washington; and Buzz Peterson, a college roommate who is director of player personnel.
In conducting his first draft for the Bobcats, Jordan selected Adam Morrison with the third pick. But Morrison never made an impact before the Bobcats traded him to the Los Angeles Lakers last year.
Brown. Morrison. Two bad lottery picks is not the way to build a reputation as an executive. But some of Jordan’s moves are paying dividends. He hired Larry Brown as the coach before the 2008-9 campaign and engineered a slew of trades over the last two seasons involving 21 players. Many of the players he acquired were considered castoffs, and Brown has made good use of them. But how long he will continue to do so is in question. There are murmurs that the well-traveled Brown will head elsewhere after this season.
“I have been successful,” Jordan said of his career as an executive. “People look at it under different microscopes. I’m held to different standards than most. The level of success I have is also more noticeable than most.”

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Old 04-15-2010, 10:05 AM   #13
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

continued
Quote:

Right now, it is easy to notice in Charlotte. While they rank 22nd in attendance, the Bobcats are averaging nearly 16,000 fans a game, their best ever and more than a 10 percent jump over last season. No N.B.A. team has improved as much in this category. The Bobcats have also sold three times as many season tickets compared to this point last season and have added 30 corporate sponsors since August.
They’re still far away, but they are hoping to duplicate the heyday of the Charlotte Hornets in the 1990s, when the team led the N.B.A. in attendance. Charlotte Coliseum shook. Players could not hear calls from coaches.
“You knew fans were going to be into the game from the jump ball to the final horn,” said Dell Curry, a former Hornets guard and now a Bobcats television broadcaster.
But things soured after Shinn became embroiled in a sexual-assault case, and he ended up moving the franchise to New Orleans for the 2002-3 season.
When the N.B.A. returned, many fans did not. Johnson lost millions of dollars annually.
“He was misled,” Felix Sabates, another minority owner, said of Johnson. “They forgot to tell him that people had such a bad taste from the Hornets and George Shinn.”
As the Bobcats struggled in recent years, some wondered about Jordan’s commitment to the franchise and the city. But he stayed and ended up owning the team, paying $25 million less than Johnson did.
Now Jordan sits within earshot of Brown’s calls from the sideline. He shakes hands with fans. He says that while he will continue living in Chicago, he will soon have a place in Charlotte.
And he already sounds comfortable in his new role as an owner. Asked about the possibility of a lockout, he said the players had to make concessions. “The model isn’t working,” he said.
Asked if Jordan the owner would acquire Jordan the player if it meant crossing the luxury-tax threshold, Jordan responded, “It depends.”
“If it takes me from the second round to the finals? Of course,” he said. “If it doesn’t, then why would I do that and risk everything?”
He called ownership a dream come true. “But it’s an opportunity I don’t want to mess up,” he said. “My ego is not big enough to not involve others. I’m willing to learn and I have been learning.”
Later this week, the Bobcats will play in their first playoff series, against Orlando. Jordan will be nearby. The boss is in.
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Old 04-29-2010, 03:05 AM   #14
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

Does anyone else feel like MJ's body language during the playoffs was just...I don't know, unprofessional? Whenever the cameras cut to him he'd seemingly have this look of disgust on his face. I understand, with a guy like MJ especially, losing is basically the worst thing in the history of humankind, but if you're a Bobcat and look over at your boss who happens to be the GOAT looking at you like you're a 4 year old who's shooting jumpers underhand it doesn't seem like it'd be much positive reinforcement.
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Old 04-29-2010, 05:06 AM   #15
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Default Re: Michael Jordan owns the Bobcats

Quote:
Originally Posted by InspiredLebowski
Does anyone else feel like MJ's body language during the playoffs was just...I don't know, unprofessional? Whenever the cameras cut to him he'd seemingly have this look of disgust on his face. I understand, with a guy like MJ especially, losing is basically the worst thing in the history of humankind, but if you're a Bobcat and look over at your boss who happens to be the GOAT looking at you like you're a 4 year old who's shooting jumpers underhand it doesn't seem like it'd be much positive reinforcement.
honestly, i noticed that too. he was constantly giving his team the death stare. i think he should lighten up a little and try some positive reinforcement. it was their first team in the playoffs as a team, what was he expecting?
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